Author Topic: The True History of the Southwest  (Read 575 times)

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Offline Glock32

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The True History of the Southwest
« on: July 28, 2014, 09:29:25 PM »
A brief history of the southwest, and the conditions under which it became part of the USA.  This whole "we didn't cross the border, the border crossed us!" claim is utter nonsense. It's even more asinine to suggest that Guatemalans and Hondurans have some sort of historical claim on the area.

http://co-ironwill.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-true-history-of-southwest-by.html


Quote
“The True History of the Southwest,” by Matthew Bracken, 2014

The fallacies surrounding the history of the Southwest are staggering, chief among them the “Aztlan” fairy tales. What is the truth? How did the Spanish Europeans conquer the Southwest? The “conquistadores” (that means “conquerors”) did it with the lance, and the lash.

For example, in 1541 Coronado entered present-day New Mexico (which included present-day Arizona during the Spanish era) searching for the “lost cities of gold.” One of his first actions upon meeting the natives was to burn hundreds of them alive in their dwellings for not handing over suspected horse thieves. That is how Spain conquered the natives of the present US Southwest—not with hugs and kisses. It was certainly no love-fest between long-lost brown-skinned soul-mates, as it is often portrayed today by the delusional Aztlaners, who spin the “new bronze race of Mestizos” toro-mierda fable.

By 1821, Mexico City was strong enough to overthrow the even more decrepit and ineffectual Spanish colonial rule. However, the distant provinces of the current U.S. Southwest were far beyond the reach of the authority of the independent but strife-torn and financially insolvent newborn government in Mexico City. These distant northern provinces received neither military protection nor needed levels of trade from the nascent Mexican government. Under Spanish colonial rule, trade with the USA was forbidden, but at least Spain provided trade and Army protection from hostile Indian attacks. Under Mexican abandonment and neglect, the Southwest received neither trade nor protection from Mexico City.

For example, Comanches and Apaches ran rampant in the 1830s in the power vacuum created by Mexican neglect, burning scores of major ranches that had been active for hundreds of years and massacring their inhabitants. Mexico City could neither defend nor keep the allegiance of its nominal subjects in these regions. Nor did it provide needed levels of trade to sustain the prior Spanish colonial era standard of living. Mexican governmental influence atrophied, withered and died at the same time that American pathfinders were opening up new routes into the region.

Increasingly, a growing United States of America was making inroads into the Southwest, via ships into California, and via wagon trains of trade goods over the Santa Fe Trail from St. Louis. The standard of living of the Spanish inhabitants of California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas subsequently increased enormously, which is why they did not support Mexico City in the 1846-48 war. In fact, the Spanish-speaking inhabitants of the Southwest never considered themselves “Mexicans” at all, ever. They went, in their own eyes, from Spanish directly to American. To this very day, if you want a punch in the nose, just call a Hispanic native of New Mexico a “Mexican.”

So how long did these self-proclaimed (but newborn), free and independent Mexican governments have even nominal jurisdiction over the American Southwest? For only 25 years, during which time they had no effective control, and the area slipped backwards by every measure until the arrival of the Americans. The Spanish inhabitants of the Southwest never transferred their loyalty from Madrid to Mexico City, because all they received from the chaotic Mexican governments was misrule, neglect, and unchecked Indian raids.

Since then, how long has the area been under firm American control? For over 160 continuous years, during which time the former Spanish inhabitants of the region, (all the while full American citizens), have prospered beyond the wildest dreams of the Mexicans still stuck in Mexico. To compare the infrastructure, roads, schools, hospitals etc. of the two regions is to understand the truth. The Mexican government has been mired in endemic graft, corruption, nepotism and chaos from the very start until today. The ordinary Mexican peons have been trampled and abused, while only the super-rich elites have thrived. This is why millions of Mexicans want to escape from Mexico today, to enjoy the benefits of living in America that they can never hope to obtain in Mexico.

And because today Mexico is a corrupt third-world pest-hole (despite having more millionaires and billionaires than Great Britain), we are supposed to let any number of Mexicans from Chiapas, Michoacán or Yucatan march into the American Southwest, and make some “historical claim” of a right to live there? From where does this absurd idea spring?

At what point in history did Indians and Mestizos from Zacatecas or Durango stake a claim on the American Southwest? (2014 update: Add the citizens of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and any other nation who can reach our unguarded border.) Neither they nor their ancestors ever lived for one single day in the American Southwest. The Spanish living in the Southwest in 1846 stayed there, and became Americans by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. There were no Spanish inhabitants of the Southwest who were marched to the border and driven into Mexico. It didn’t happen. The Spanish in the Southwest welcomed American citizenship, which brought stability, protection from Indian raids, and a vast increase in their standard of living with the increase in trade with America.

In summary, no current inhabitants of Mexico (or Guatemala, etc.) have a claim on even one single inch of the American Southwest. Not one single citizen of Mexico is sneaking into the United States to reclaim property their ancestors were deprived of. Not one. They are criminal invaders and colonizers, pure and simple.

It’s time Americans learned the true history of our Southwest, as a counter to the currently prevalent "Aztlan" fairy tales put out by "La Raza" (The Race), “the Brown Berets of Aztlan,” "MEChA" (the Student Movement for Aztlan, whose very symbol is a lit “mecha” or fuse on a dynamite bomb), and other radical (and usually openly communist) anti-American groups.

2014 post script: The U.S. Constitution, in Article 4, Section 4, still mandates that the executive branch—President Barack Obama—must protect the states against invasion. Instead of protecting the states from invasion, our rogue president and his gangster henchmen are now intentionally and with forethought laying open our national borders, and are encouraging and assisting the invaders.

How is this not treason?
"The Fourth Estate is less honorable than the First Profession."

- Yours Truly

Online Libertas

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Re: The True History of the Southwest
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2014, 07:21:50 AM »
It is treason, and since nobody of nominal authority is doing jack to fight it the job is left to us.  And the Aztlan BS is just weak-ass cover for agitators to get weak-minded fools to do their bidding and gin up this ilk so LaRaza and related crap can get more power and more funding to corrupt the system - call it the Weather Underground or Black Panther effect...or the Justice Bros schtick, it's all the same race-baiting/divisive racket!  Time we act to the lawlessness like Patton and started strapping killed bandits on the hoods of our vehicles!  They want a war?  Fine, and if the Obama Regime sides with them...two birds, one stone.

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Online richb

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Re: The True History of the Southwest
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2014, 04:44:26 PM »
The Southwest was never truly controlled by the Mexican government.   It was too weak and corrupt to do so.   Frankly we paid too much for the last chunk,  the Gadsden Purchase,  as most of it is mostly worthless desert.   

If Mexico thinks it has a rightful claim on it,  then we have a similar claim on the northern part of the Louisiana Purchase that is now within Canada.

Mexico would still have the same problem they had in the 19th century,  it would have no way to control it.   If anything we should gobble up more of Mexico. 

Offline AlanS

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Re: The True History of the Southwest
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2014, 07:17:27 PM »
Mexico would still have the same problem they had in the 19th century,  it would have no way to control it.   If anything we should gobble up more of Mexico.

They can't control the northern part now. The cartels don't seem to have a problem.
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Offline trapeze

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Re: The True History of the Southwest
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2014, 01:09:47 AM »
Must include this:

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Gonzales is one of the earliest Anglo-American settlements in Texas, the first west of the Colorado River. It was established by Empresario Green DeWitt as the capital of his colony in August 1825. DeWitt named the community for Rafael Gonzáles, governor of Coahuila y Tejas.[5] Informally, the community was known as the Dewitt Colony.

The original settlement (located where Highway 90-A crosses Kerr Creek) was abandoned in 1826 after two American Indian attacks. It was rebuilt nearby in 1827. The town remains today as it was originally surveyed.

Gonzales is most famous as the "Lexington of Texas" because it was the site of the first skirmish of the Texas Revolution. In 1831, the Mexican government had granted Green DeWitt's request for a small cannon for protection against Indian attacks. At the outbreak of disputes between the Anglo settlers and the Mexican authorities in 1835, a contingent of more than 100 Mexican soldiers was sent from San Antonio to retrieve the cannon.

When the soldiers arrived, there were only 18 men in Gonzales, but they refused to return the cannon, and soon men from the surrounding area joined them. Texians under the command of John H. Moore confronted them. Sarah DeWitt and her daughter sewed a flag bearing the likeness of the cannon and the words "Come and Take It," which was flown when the first shots of Texan independence were fired on October 2, 1835. The Texians successfully resisted the Mexican troops in what became known as the Battle of Gonzales.[6][7]

Gonzales later contributed 32 heroic men from the Gonzales Ranging Company to the defense of the Alamo.[8] It was the only city to send aid to the Alamo and all 32 men lost their lives defending the Alamo. It was to Gonzales that Susanna Dickinson, widow of one of the Alamo defenders, and Joe, the slave of William B. Travis, fled with news of the Alamo massacre. General Sam Houston was there organizing the Texas forces. He anticipated the town would be the next target of General Antonio López de Santa Anna' Mexican army. Gathering the Texians at Peach Creek east of town, under the Sam Houston Oak, Houston ordered Gonzales burned, to deny it to the enemy. He began a retreat toward the U.S. border. The widows and orphans of Gonzales and their neighbors were forced to flee, thus precipitating the Runaway Scrape.

The town was derelict immediately after the Texas Revolution, but was eventually rebuilt on the original site throughout the early 1840s. By 1850, the town had a population of 300. The population rose to 1,703 in the 1860 census, 2,900 by the mid-1880s, and 4,297 in 1900. Part of the growth of the late 19th century can be attributed to the arrival of various immigrants, among them Jews, many of whom became peddlers and merchants.[9]

Green Dewitt, btw, died in Mexico (lobbying for more land for the colony) of cholera, presumably from drinking Mexican water. He never saw the revolution.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2014, 01:15:52 AM by trapeze »
In a doomsday scenario, hippies will be among the first casualties. So not everything about doomsday will be bad.

Online richb

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Re: The True History of the Southwest
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2014, 05:44:37 PM »
Interesting to see that governments, no matter where or how they are run,  always do the same stupid things.   Instead of fixing the "indian" problem,  they go after the folks with the cannon.   The more things change,  the more they don't.