It's About Liberty: A Conservative Forum

Topics => Economy => Topic started by: Pandora on March 30, 2011, 02:05:18 PM

Title: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on March 30, 2011, 02:05:18 PM
Quote
Chips are disappearing from bags, candy from boxes and vegetables from cans.

As an expected increase in the cost of raw materials looms for late summer, consumers are beginning to encounter shrinking food packages.

With unemployment still high, companies in recent months have tried to camouflage price increases by selling their products in tiny and tinier packages. So far, the changes are most visible at the grocery store, where shoppers are paying the same amount, but getting less.

For Lisa Stauber, stretching her budget to feed her nine children in Houston often requires careful monitoring at the store. Recently, when she cooked her usual three boxes of pasta for a big family dinner, she was surprised by a smaller yield, and she began to suspect something was up.

“Whole wheat pasta had gone from 16 ounces to 13.25 ounces,” she said. “I bought three boxes and it wasn’t enough — that was a little embarrassing. I bought the same amount I always buy, I just didn’t realize it, because who reads the sizes all the time?”

Ms. Stauber, 33, said she began inspecting her other purchases, aisle by aisle. Many canned vegetables dropped to 13 or 14 ounces from 16; boxes of baby wipes went to 72 from 80; and sugar was stacked in 4-pound, not 5-pound, bags, she said.

'It's sneaky'

Five or so years ago, Ms. Stauber bought 16-ounce cans of corn. Then they were 15.5 ounces, then 14.5 ounces, and the size is still dropping. “The first time I’ve ever seen an 11-ounce can of corn at the store was about three weeks ago, and I was just floored,” she said. “It’s sneaky, because they figure people won’t know.”

In every economic downturn in the last few decades, companies have reduced the size of some products, disguising price increases and avoiding comparisons on same-size packages, before and after an increase. Each time, the marketing campaigns are coy; this time, the smaller versions are “greener” (packages good for the environment) or more “portable” (little carry bags for the takeout lifestyle) or “healthier” (fewer calories).

Where companies cannot change sizes — as in clothing or appliances — they have warned that prices will be going up, as the costs of cotton, energy, grain and other raw materials are rising.

“Consumers are generally more sensitive to changes in prices than to changes in quantity,” John T. Gourville, a marketing professor at Harvard Business School, said. “And companies try to do it in such a way that you don’t notice, maybe keeping the height and width the same, but changing the depth so the silhouette of the package on the shelf looks the same. Or sometimes they add more air to the chips bag or a scoop in the bottom of the peanut butter jar so it looks the same size.”

Thomas J. Alexander, a finance professor at Northwood University, said that businesses had little choice these days when faced with increases in the costs of their raw goods. “Companies only have pricing power when wages are also increasing, and we’re not seeing that right now because of the high unemployment,” he said.
Story: Higher clothing prices the latest fashion trend

Most companies reduce products quietly, hoping consumers are not reading labels too closely.

But the downsizing keeps occurring. A can of Chicken of the Sea albacore tuna is now packed at 5 ounces, instead of the 6-ounce version still on some shelves, and in some cases, the 5-ounce can costs more than the larger one. Bags of Doritos, Tostitos and Fritos now hold 20 percent fewer chips than in 2009, though a spokesman said those extra chips were just a “limited time” offer.

New containers, terrific advantages?
Trying to keep customers from feeling cheated, some companies are introducing new containers that, they say, have terrific advantages — and just happen to contain less product.

Kraft is introducing “Fresh Stacks” packages for its Nabisco Premium saltines and Honey Maid graham crackers.

Each has about 15 percent fewer crackers than the standard boxes, but the price has not changed. Kraft says that because the Fresh Stacks include more sleeves of crackers, they are more portable and “the packaging format offers the benefit of added freshness,” said Basil T. Maglaris, a Kraft spokesman, in an e-mail.

And Procter & Gamble is expanding its “Future Friendly” products, which it promotes as using at least 15 percent less energy, water or packaging than the standard ones.

“They are more environmentally friendly, that’s true — but they’re also smaller,” said Paula Rosenblum, managing partner for retail systems research at Focus.com, an online specialist network. “They announce it as great new packaging, and in fact what it is is smaller packaging, smaller amounts of the product,” she said.

Or marketers design a new shape and size altogether, complicating any effort to comparison shop.

The unwrapped Reese’s Minis, which were introduced in February, are smaller than the foil-wrapped Miniatures. They are also more expensive — $0.57 an ounce at FreshDirect, versus $0.37 an ounce for the individually wrapped.

At H. J. Heinz, prices on ketchup, condiments, sauces and Ore-Ida products have already gone up, and the company is selling smaller-than-usual versions of condiments, like 5-ounce bottles of items like Heinz 57 Sauce sold at places like Dollar General.

“I have never regretted raising prices in the face of significant cost pressures, since we can always course-correct if the outcome is not as we expected,” Heinz’s chairman and chief executive, William R. Johnson, said last month.

Think small
While companies have long adjusted package sizes to appeal to changing tastes, from supersizes to 100-calorie packs, the recession drove a lot of corporations to think small. The standard size for Edy’s ice cream went from 2 liters to 1.5 in 2008. And Tropicana shifted to a 59-ounce carton rather than a 64-ounce one last year, after the cost of oranges rose.

With prices for energy and for raw materials like corn, cotton and sugar creeping up and expected to surge later this year, companies are barely bothering to cover up the shrinking packs.

“Typically, the product manufacturers are doing this slightly ahead of the perceived inflationary issues,” Ms. Rosenblum said. “Lately, it hasn’t been subtle — I mean, they’ve been shrinking by noticeable amounts.”

That can work to a company’s benefit. In the culture of thinness, smaller may be a selling point. It lets retailers honestly claim, for example, that a snack package contains fewer calories — without having to change the ingredients a smidge.

“For indulgences like ice cream, chocolate and potato chips, consumers may say ‘I don’t mind getting a little bit less because I shouldn’t be consuming so much anyway,’ ” said Professor Gourville. “That’s a harder argument to make with something like diapers or orange juice.”

But even while companies blame the recession for smaller packages, they rarely increase sizes in good times, he said.

He traced the shrinking package trends to the late 1980s, when companies like Chock full o’ Nuts downsized the one-pound tin of ground coffee to 13 ounces. That shocked consumers, for whom a pound of coffee had been as standard a purchase unit as a dozen eggs or a six-pack of beer, he said.

Once the economy rebounds, he said, a new “jumbo” size product typically emerges, at an even higher cost per ounce. Then the gradual shrinking process of all package sizes begins anew, he said.

“It’s a continuous cycle, where at some point the smallest package offered becomes so small that perhaps they’re phased out and replaced by the medium-size package, which has been shrunk down,” he said.

This article, Food Inflation Kept Hidden in Tinier Bags, first appeared in The New York Times.

Copyright © 2010 The New York Times

Unh hunh.  The no-self-discipline figger they're being done "a favor"?  Anybody else buying that?

As for the rest, I've definitely noticed.  It's been going on with paper products for some time now; the damn paper-towel roll falls out of the under-counter holder unlike the time when it was a struggle to get the big, fat one on there.

Link (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42317990/#fullstory)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on March 30, 2011, 02:45:02 PM
I noticed this with flour and sugar years ago and it's annoying.  Used to able to get 5 lb bags of apples, now at my store here they're all 3 lb. The pasta I buy is still 16 oz. thankfully since we use a lot of that.

On the other hand, I tend to buy some stuff in bulk and those things are still the same size.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on March 30, 2011, 02:58:47 PM
Funny, the example they use of tuna is something I noticed a while back. Now a can barely makes two sandwiches.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Glock32 on March 30, 2011, 04:15:37 PM
I've been noticing this trend for a while too, but it has definitely accelerated. In addition to the reduced volume, I've noticed some individual items are simply smaller than they used to be. Two of my favorite junk foods - Wise Cheese Doodles and Sweet 16 donuts - have both shrunk noticeably.

I just always think of Chairman Zero, copping his best Mussolini impression, staring blankly into the camera so as to dazzle us with how effortlessly he contemplates, opined: "Under my administration, the price of electricity would necessarily skyrocket."

These a-holes are actively trying to marginalize our country, and I am tired of conservatives who think it is not genteel to acknowledge this obvious fact.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on March 30, 2011, 05:23:00 PM
Ica scream is the one that pisses me off. It's hard to fing a true half gallon.Pasta you have to watch because the whole wheat stuff is only 13 oz in some brands.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on March 30, 2011, 05:30:57 PM
Ica scream is the one that pisses me off. It's hard to fing a true half gallon.Pasta you have to watch because the whole wheat stuff is only 13 oz in some brands.


Yeah, the ice cream got smaller and price went up. 

I bought a box of crackers the other day and my daughter pulled out the bag to open it.  It looked half empty, checked the box for the weight and decided I'm not buying those any more. I've made my own before I guess i can do that again.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on March 30, 2011, 05:35:24 PM
At least when Breyer's shrunk the ice cream volume, there was a discussion from/with them about it.  IIRC, they issued an explanation about volume vs price.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: warpmine on March 30, 2011, 10:18:31 PM
This is what the industry called "down sizing" began over a decade ago. A gallon of juice went to 96 oz and now to 89 oz. Ice Cream went from 64 to 56 to now 48 oz or six pints. Breakfast cereals  went from 14 to 12 to 10.5 to 9 oz which is only slightly larger than the one serving size mini boxes available in restaurants. Cranberry sauce went from 16 to 14 oz. The list goes on and on so what are we going to do abbout it. Me and the Mrs shop long and hard before the purchase and then when the deal arises then it's buy in quantity time. ::rant::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on March 30, 2011, 10:27:30 PM
This is what the industry called "down sizing" began over a decade ago. A gallon of juice went to 96 oz and now to 89 oz. Ice Cream went from 64 to 56 to now 48 oz or six pints. Breakfast cereals  went from 14 to 12 to 10.5 to 9 oz which is only slightly larger than the one serving size mini boxes available in restaurants. Cranberry sauce went from 16 to 14 oz. The list goes on and on so what are we going to do abbout it. Me and the Mrs shop long and hard before the purchase and then when the deal arises then it's buy in quantity time. ::rant::

 That's the way we work it. Buy the basics and the rest is vulture shopping if the deal is there buy a bunch if it's something we'll use. And if there's no deal on what we want and it's not that important we wait it out. And watch the fliers from all the stores and work it out so if were in an area we stop and shop.


  Hell I have 5 cases of tomatoes coming from Conn. that I'll pick up  when were in N.C.(outer banks) on vacation.  cases imported Italian tomatoes for a little less than a buck a can and those get added to the 5 cases I already have for rotation.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on March 30, 2011, 10:30:40 PM
... Me and the Mrs shop long and hard before the purchase and then when the deal arises then it's buy in quantity time. ::rant::

If it's not on sale and a good buy it's a no purchase. There's other food in the pantry to eat. If they want me to buy sell it cheap.

Mr. Foodstore send that message to your lobbyist for me, thank you.

He knows I'm telling the truth because he has a record of my purchases.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on March 30, 2011, 10:36:45 PM
This is what the industry called "down sizing" began over a decade ago. A gallon of juice went to 96 oz and now to 89 oz. Ice Cream went from 64 to 56 to now 48 oz or six pints. Breakfast cereals  went from 14 to 12 to 10.5 to 9 oz which is only slightly larger than the one serving size mini boxes available in restaurants. Cranberry sauce went from 16 to 14 oz. The list goes on and on so what are we going to do abbout it. Me and the Mrs shop long and hard before the purchase and then when the deal arises then it's buy in quantity time. ::rant::

 That's the way we work it. Buy the basics and the rest is vulture shopping if the deal is there buy a bunch if it's something we'll use. And if there's no deal on what we want and it's not that important we wait it out. And watch the fliers from all the stores and work it out so if were in an area we stop and shop.


  Hell I have 5 cases of tomatoes coming from Conn. that I'll pick up  when were in N.C.(outer banks) on vacation.  cases imported Italian tomatoes for a little less than a buck a can and those get added to the 5 cases I already have for rotation.

What kind of tomatoes were those again?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on March 31, 2011, 07:33:11 AM
Didn't this downsizing of packages start eons ago with cereal?  Seems to me they all started going down that line after that.  Same concept with money and precious metals before it...it's all a form of debasement!  Everybody screws us, but is is primarily the governments fault, they started the thievery, others just picked up the fricken example and ran with it!

 ::gaah::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on March 31, 2011, 11:19:35 AM
I vaguely remember some hoohah in the early 70s over the rapidly rising price of coffee; I believe that's when the can-downsizing started with that, and because the price of sugar also became problematic then, I started using a lot of honey.

We've always paid more for sugar than we could be if congress hadn't instituted a protectionist racket for our domestic sugar producers, and there's the reason for a lot of the corn-syrup in food as well.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on March 31, 2011, 11:23:17 AM
Ahh yes, forgot about coffee and sugar!  Sugar I should've known, not a coffee drinker, but I do have a sweet tooth!  We have many sugar beet farmers benefiting from this in MN.  I suspect there are many others protected much to the consumers detriment!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Sectionhand on March 31, 2011, 11:47:40 AM
 I suspect there are many others protected much to the consumers detriment!

You mean like the empty suit we got two years ago and are still paying through the nose for ?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Glock32 on March 31, 2011, 07:16:29 PM
Sugar has become an attractive option again because the diversion of corn to ethanol has impacted the corn syrup production as well.

Wage/price controls and subsidies, they work so so well. /s
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 01, 2011, 08:08:48 AM
More on inflation...

http://www.cnbc.com/id/42363054 (http://www.cnbc.com/id/42363054)

I love this understatement!  -


"Minneapolis Fed President Narayana Kocherlakota said Thursday that quantitative easing has boosted inflation expectations more than he had anticipated and that higher short-term rates are possible in late 2011. "

Yeah, The Ben Bernanke will raise rates!  And even if he did, he wouldn't raise them high enough or soon enough to matter!

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on April 03, 2011, 05:51:45 PM

Price list 2005:

Sugar: 4lbs.                   00.97
Vegetables: 5- 14.5oz .  $1.00
Tomato sauce: 8 oz.      $00.98
Tomatoes: 14.5oz. 5 for  $2.00

Flour: all purpose 1 lb.     $00.88
Wesson oil: 48oz              $  1.88
Ketchup: 24oz DelMonte  $00.88

Bologna: Rath 12oz          $00.88
Hot Dogs: 12oz pkg.   3 for $1.00
Sausage: Smoked 14oz      $00.99


Onions: Yellow  8lbs          $1.00
Tomatoes: 3lbs for             $1.00
Bell Pepper: green     4 for $1.00
Cucumbers:               4 for $1.00


Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 29, 2011, 11:09:02 PM
Saturday night, homemade pizza has become the thing at our house (what was I thinking?!I have to fit it among all the other Saturday stuff with the kids)  -- whatever family is around joins in.  I went to get cheese today and discovered many of  the packages were 6 to 7 oz besides the 8 oz. Hummm.

Now that I've been noticing the smaller packaging on stuff it really ticks me off.



Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on April 30, 2011, 05:16:31 AM
One of the first items in which I noticed the downsizing, years ago, was potato chips.  That 8 oz. bag has now shrunk to around 4 - 4.5 oz. (3.75 oz. for flavored chips).  I recently noticed a game Tropicana Orange Juice plays:  The regular oj is still in 64 oz. cartons.  But the low acid one, which I buy, is now in 59 oz. cartons, as are all the other 'specialized' juices like calcium fortified, etc.  The cartons look so similar in size that it is a deliberate deception.  As mentioned above, another thing I've noticed the downsizing of is canned goods.  I noticed it with the chicken/beef broth cans, down from 16 oz to 14.5 oz.  Pretty soon, the prepacked food items will fit into a child's doll house and look quite normal.

I guess we're all going on a diet, whether we want to or not.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on April 30, 2011, 05:33:21 AM
Was out & about with my brother yesterday and part of our mission was to find artificial sweetener for our mom. No luck. We tried seven different grocery stores and three drug stores.

Our discussion revealed the mutual recognition that some long familiar items are simply disappearing off the shelves. Condiments, snacks, condensed broths/flavorings, cleansers and kitchen products, even a deodorant that I've used for a dozen years. Vanished without warning, without a trace, and without explanation. When I've approached store managers "Did we find everything we were looking for today?" "No, 'we' didn't!") they strike a reflective pose and wonder (aloud) "Perhaps the manufacturer pulled it due to low sales"

Now I'm not suggesting any sort of conspiracy but that was pure bullspit. In many cases it is products that have held prominence in the marketplace going back generations.

So I'm going back to my SHTF lists and reviewing for additions of things that may not be indispensable, but sure make the difference between living and merely surviving ;-)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on April 30, 2011, 08:15:59 AM
Was out & about with my brother yesterday and part of our mission was to find artificial sweetener for our mom. No luck. We tried seven different grocery stores and three drug stores.

Our discussion revealed the mutual recognition that some long familiar items are simply disappearing off the shelves. Condiments, snacks, condensed broths/flavorings, cleansers and kitchen products, even a deodorant that I've used for a dozen years. Vanished without warning, without a trace, and without explanation. When I've approached store managers "Did we find everything we were looking for today?" "No, 'we' didn't!") they strike a reflective pose and wonder (aloud) "Perhaps the manufacturer pulled it due to low sales"

Now I'm not suggesting any sort of conspiracy but that was pure bullspit. In many cases it is products that have held prominence in the marketplace going back generations.

So I'm going back to my SHTF lists and reviewing for additions of things that may not be indispensable, but sure make the difference between living and merely surviving ;-)




 I almost have to wonder if a lot of that stuff isn't being exported for higher profits.And at the same time create a shortage so they can raise prices here.I can see one thing being scarce that might happen but for several items at a time is a little suspect.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 30, 2011, 09:52:03 AM
Was out & about with my brother yesterday and part of our mission was to find artificial sweetener for our mom. No luck. We tried seven different grocery stores and three drug stores.

Our discussion revealed the mutual recognition that some long familiar items are simply disappearing off the shelves. Condiments, snacks, condensed broths/flavorings, cleansers and kitchen products, even a deodorant that I've used for a dozen years. Vanished without warning, without a trace, and without explanation. When I've approached store managers "Did we find everything we were looking for today?" "No, 'we' didn't!") they strike a reflective pose and wonder (aloud) "Perhaps the manufacturer pulled it due to low sales"

Now I'm not suggesting any sort of conspiracy but that was pure bullspit. In many cases it is products that have held prominence in the marketplace going back generations.

So I'm going back to my SHTF lists and reviewing for additions of things that may not be indispensable, but sure make the difference between living and merely surviving ;-)

I've noticed this as well and not just with food/hygiene items (the soap we used is just not available anymore).  It's everything

We were looking to replace the front-porch chairs, the kind that are made with padded fabric on a metal folding frame with arms.  Once upon a time, they could be found in a vast variety of colors and patterns.  Now, they're tan or brown -- if you can find them -- and mostly come in a set with a table.  WTF?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on April 30, 2011, 11:00:16 AM
Was out & about with my brother yesterday and part of our mission was to find artificial sweetener for our mom. No luck. We tried seven different grocery stores and three drug stores.

Our discussion revealed the mutual recognition that some long familiar items are simply disappearing off the shelves. Condiments, snacks, condensed broths/flavorings, cleansers and kitchen products, even a deodorant that I've used for a dozen years. Vanished without warning, without a trace, and without explanation. When I've approached store managers "Did we find everything we were looking for today?" "No, 'we' didn't!") they strike a reflective pose and wonder (aloud) "Perhaps the manufacturer pulled it due to low sales"

Now I'm not suggesting any sort of conspiracy but that was pure bullspit. In many cases it is products that have held prominence in the marketplace going back generations.

So I'm going back to my SHTF lists and reviewing for additions of things that may not be indispensable, but sure make the difference between living and merely surviving ;-)

I've noticed this as well and not just with food/hygiene items (the soap we used is just not available anymore).  It's everything

We were looking to replace the front-porch chairs, the kind that are made with padded fabric on a metal folding frame with arms.  Once upon a time, they could be found in a vast variety of colors and patterns.  Now, they're tan or brown -- if you can find them -- and mostly come in a set with a table.  WTF?

 There are lot of things that you aren't going to be able to get any more. The chair thing is almost the old you can have any color you wan't so log as it's black. The companies are starting to limit choices so the retailers don't have to carry as much.

 People are getting pushed in directions that they have never had to go before.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 30, 2011, 11:24:03 AM
Quote
People are getting pushed in directions that they have never had to go before.

In some respects, I am feeling pushed; in others, I feel restricted.

I understand the point of "just in time" stocking/ordering system -- so merchandise doesn't need warehousing and accounting for -- but I don't get the point of stocking a dozen tan chairs when the retailer can show six of them and six of other colors/patterns.  Somebody decided tan was good enough and if I wanted a chair, I could just take that or nothing, and that pisses me off.

Did the entire world's manufacturers decide tan was fine and that was it?  If my internet searches offer any clue, I'd have to say so, but I just don't get it.

There used to be three dozen different soaps from which to choose.  Now, there's a handful.  I imagine much of this comes from "mergers and acquisitions" of smaller companies absorbed into conglomerates, but I don't understand the restriction of choice, and I definitely don't understand why I'm supposed to be satisfied instead with "showering systems" which consist of a scrubbie and a liquid soap.

I am unable to find a decent hairbrush -- they're all made of that plastic crap, and mostly by the same company.  So what happened?  All the hair-brush makers suddenly found brushes were not profitable and went out of business?

I know much of what's sold comes from China, but why don't I see products from other places as well?  Nobody else in any other country manufactures anything?  I'm willing to pay more for a quality item, I just don't often see one available.

I feel herded.  I don't like it.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Predator Don on April 30, 2011, 11:25:54 AM
Hey, we have it in black and white.....If you wanted color, you should have purchased during the previous administration."
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 30, 2011, 11:45:38 AM
Hey, we have it in black and white.....If you wanted color, you should have purchased during the previous administration."

This was happening during the previous administration as well.  It's escalated to the point of noticeable now.

To clarify my previous plaint of "I don't get it", I do.  We're being Argentina'd, I suspect.

I've read a good deal of what an Argentinian, Farfel, has written about what happened there and from my observations, I see it here as well.  One thing in particular stands out; most women's lipsticks and cologne just disappeared from the market there because Argentinian money was worthless.  His advice was to purchase of few of these items for barter -- with bureaucrats in particular -- before they became unavailable.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on April 30, 2011, 12:00:05 PM

It's a way to avoid increasing manufacturing cost so as not to raise the price.  To to the majority of people and the bean counters it masks inflation, company profits remain, sales continue, quality is not sacrificed, these are the smallest ripples of inflation.

Edit for clarification.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on April 30, 2011, 12:11:17 PM
I just this minute got back from an emergency run to the store to find out that Ronzony now packs only 12 onces in the bow tie pasta boxes. I bought them today but dam a full 1/4 pound removed. I'll be buying something else from now on.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Sectionhand on April 30, 2011, 12:44:29 PM
Anyone notice large air holes in the loaves of bread lately ? I'm not kidding . I've bought loaves of bread lately from completely different bakeries wherein up to four or five slices will have silver dollar sized air holes ! Although they don't note a different net wt. on the bag .
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Predator Don on April 30, 2011, 02:01:03 PM
Smaller packages....less choice....Inflation isn't far behind.....I mean, it's actually here, but inflation by gov't measuring practices.

No one wants inventory in todays hope and change climate. Everyone is streamlining product. Older, even more established product in many cases is less profitable. Expansion of product is in the generic fields. Less people with extra income (No pelosi, gov't checks do not keep the country running) equates to lesser brand buying. More price conscience shopping. More private (and more profitable) label sales. Less speciality product and stores....More general merchandise operations.

We are being assimilated. Resistance is futile.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on April 30, 2011, 03:32:33 PM
Anyone notice large air holes in the loaves of bread lately ? I'm not kidding . I've bought loaves of bread lately from completely different bakeries wherein up to four or five slices will have silver dollar sized air holes ! Although they don't note a different net wt. on the bag .

Now that you mention it, yeah, I've seen that, too.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Glock32 on April 30, 2011, 05:30:15 PM
I cannot find buttermilk anymore. I guess the health nazis got rid of that. I like to soak okra and squash in it before breading. I guess pretty soon the breading will be gone too, since frying food will be a felony.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 30, 2011, 05:38:22 PM
I was worried I wasn't going to be able to find egg-nog around Christmas time.  It didn't show up in the stores until a week before here and, as I buy it every year, that was unusual.

Guess I'll have to learn how to make my own.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on May 03, 2011, 02:38:31 AM
Gunsmith brought home a Mrs. Smith Apple Pie today.  They've changed their procedure.  Now, it comes "pre-baked".  Oh! happy days!  If you want, you can either stick in the oven for half an hour right out of the freezer, or let it simply defrost and it's ready to eat.

Mrs. Smith's was the best for ready-made apple pie, so this may prove to be a disappointment.  We'll see.

Haven't checked the sizing either.

What the hell is the matter with people that they can't wait a stinkin' 60 minutes for a pie?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on May 03, 2011, 08:14:27 AM
Gunsmith brought home a Mrs. Smith Apple Pie today.  They've changed their procedure.  Now, it comes "pre-baked".  Oh! happy days!  If you want, you can either stick in the oven for half an hour right out of the freezer, or let it simply defrost and it's ready to eat.

Mrs. Smith's was the best for ready-made apple pie, so this may prove to be a disappointment.  We'll see.

Haven't checked the sizing either.

What the hell is the matter with people that they can't wait a stinkin' 60 minutes for a pie?

 I love the smell in the house while it bakes.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on May 03, 2011, 10:51:46 AM

Avoids litigation caused from eating undercooked food.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on May 03, 2011, 10:52:02 AM
Gunsmith brought home a Mrs. Smith Apple Pie today.  They've changed their procedure.  Now, it comes "pre-baked".  Oh! happy days!  If you want, you can either stick in the oven for half an hour right out of the freezer, or let it simply defrost and it's ready to eat.

Mrs. Smith's was the best for ready-made apple pie, so this may prove to be a disappointment.  We'll see.

Haven't checked the sizing either.

What the hell is the matter with people that they can't wait a stinkin' 60 minutes for a pie?

In my case I can't bake for squat so I don't have to wait, I just go the Baker's Square!

 ;D
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on June 05, 2011, 07:46:39 PM
Keebler Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies were "reduced" at Food Lion today, from a 1 lb. 2 oz. package to a 14.2 oz package for $2.79, unless you have the "card"; then they'll be $2 for however long the special lasts.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on June 05, 2011, 09:20:51 PM
Keebler Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies were "reduced" at Food Lion today, from a 1 lb. 2 oz. package to a 14.2 oz package for $2.79, unless you have the "card"; then they'll be $2 for however long the special lasts.



 Time to start baking at home.That's a shame because I have a weakness for them.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on June 05, 2011, 09:48:28 PM
Keebler Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies were "reduced" at Food Lion today, from a 1 lb. 2 oz. package to a 14.2 oz package for $2.79, unless you have the "card"; then they'll be $2 for however long the special lasts.



 Time to start baking at home.That's a shame because I have a weakness for them.

Dang.  I didn't know that or I'd have brought you some.  No time like the present to get biiiiigggger.   ;D
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on June 05, 2011, 10:16:01 PM
Keebler Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies were "reduced" at Food Lion today, from a 1 lb. 2 oz. package to a 14.2 oz package for $2.79, unless you have the "card"; then they'll be $2 for however long the special lasts.



 Time to start baking at home.That's a shame because I have a weakness for them.

Dang.  I didn't know that or I'd have brought you some.  No time like the present to get biiiiigggger.   ;D

 Please we had prime rib tonight and Joe and I ate  what looked like what Fred Flinstone would have eaten.It's 11:15 P.M. and were still stuffed.I just love food and I can't say I'm ashamed of it.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on June 05, 2011, 10:23:09 PM
Keebler Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies were "reduced" at Food Lion today, from a 1 lb. 2 oz. package to a 14.2 oz package for $2.79, unless you have the "card"; then they'll be $2 for however long the special lasts.



 Time to start baking at home.That's a shame because I have a weakness for them.

Dang.  I didn't know that or I'd have brought you some.  No time like the present to get biiiiigggger.   ;D

 Please we had prime rib tonight and Joe and I ate  what looked like what Fred Flinstone would have eaten.It's 11:15 P.M. and were still stuffed.I just love food and I can't say I'm ashamed of it.

Whup!  I hear that.

We had made-at-home grilled beef/deer cheeseburgers w/fries.  Not prime rib, but excellent nevertheless.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On another note, I was thinking earlier best to include cans various kinds of pie-filling in the hoard for a time when fruit may not be so easily had.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on June 05, 2011, 11:47:56 PM
Keebler Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies were "reduced" at Food Lion today, from a 1 lb. 2 oz. package to a 14.2 oz package for $2.79, unless you have the "card"; then they'll be $2 for however long the special lasts.



 Time to start baking at home.That's a shame because I have a weakness for them.

Dang.  I didn't know that or I'd have brought you some.  No time like the present to get biiiiigggger.   ;D

 Please we had prime rib tonight and Joe and I ate  what looked like what Fred Flinstone would have eaten.It's 11:15 P.M. and were still stuffed.I just love food and I can't say I'm ashamed of it.

Whup!  I hear that.

We had made-at-home grilled beef/deer cheeseburgers w/fries.  Not prime rib, but excellent nevertheless.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On another note, I was thinking earlier best to include cans various kinds of pie-filling in the hoard for a time when fruit may not be so easily had.

 You mean can your own in season fruit?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on June 05, 2011, 11:53:31 PM
Not specifically.  I really should look into canning what's available around here in season.  

I was thinking more of picking up several grocery-store cans of pumpkin, cherry, apple and whatever floats else yer boat for the hoard.

eta:  And I'm thinking we ought to stop calling such "the hoard".  That's what people who want to confiscate your stuff characterize it as.  It's "preps".
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on June 09, 2011, 11:14:44 AM
And then there's the traditional sources of food inflation...

http://itsaboutliberty.com/index.php/topic,913.new.html#new (http://itsaboutliberty.com/index.php/topic,913.new.html#new)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on August 17, 2011, 06:42:50 AM
I think this fits in perfectly with this thread!

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/record-number-people-say-they-are-paying-more-groceries-now-ever (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/record-number-people-say-they-are-paying-more-groceries-now-ever)

93% feeling the pinch, that 7% must be wasting away in the waiting room...
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: jpatrickham on September 02, 2011, 12:11:30 PM
 ::cussing:: ::rant::Don't get me started, to late. Look at ice cream, smaller container but cost more. Laundry Detergent, smaller container but it cost more. The list goes on and on. Now, they will come up with economical jumbo size, and the original size will make a comeback, only cost more! ::bashing:: ::angry:: ::outrage::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on September 02, 2011, 12:13:58 PM
::cussing:: ::rant::Don't get me started, to late. Look at ice cream, smaller container but cost more. Laundry Detergent, smaller container but it cost more. The list goes on and on. Now, they will come up with economical jumbo size, and the original size will make a comeback, only cost more! ::bashing:: ::angry:: ::outrage::

Remember when we used to say "a gallon of ice cream"?  Now, it comes in quarts.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on September 02, 2011, 12:34:19 PM

Can sizing hit my neighborhood, diced tomatoes 10oz.  They're sneaky too, the cans are on sale and priced irresistibly low.  Next week they will be at regular price and the 15oz cans won't be there.


Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on September 02, 2011, 12:40:01 PM
Progresso pulled the same nonsense months ago with their red and white clam sauces.

I can see why they don't really want to raise the price straight out, so they cut the quantity instead, but it's not only basically dishonest, I've got to buy two cans now instead one.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: jpatrickham on September 02, 2011, 01:55:59 PM
Progresso pulled the same nonsense months ago with their red and white clam sauces.

I can see why they don't really want to raise the price straight out, so they cut the quantity instead, but it's not only basically dishonest, I've got to buy two cans now instead one.




I took Glenn Becks advise, stocked up starting last year. We have a years worth of food. Also enough bullets to defend it! Call me crazy but, I have a wonderful Son who is expecting a new Baby any minute. I owe them everything I can give them, till death!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on September 02, 2011, 08:13:19 PM
Progresso pulled the same nonsense months ago with their red and white clam sauces.

I can see why they don't really want to raise the price straight out, so they cut the quantity instead, but it's not only basically dishonest, I've got to buy two cans now instead one.




I took Glenn Becks advise, stocked up starting last year. We have a years worth of food. Also enough bullets to defend it! Call me crazy but, I have a wonderful Son who is expecting a new Baby any minute. I owe them everything I can give them, till death!



Preaching to the choir!! ::clapping::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: jpatrickham on September 02, 2011, 09:48:35 PM
Progresso pulled the same nonsense months ago with their red and white clam sauces.

I can see why they don't really want to raise the price straight out, so they cut the quantity instead, but it's not only basically dishonest, I've got to buy two cans now instead one.




I took Glenn Becks advise, stocked up starting last year. We have a years worth of food. Also enough bullets to defend it! Call me crazy but, I have a wonderful Son who is expecting a new Baby any minute. I owe them everything I can give them, till death!



Preaching to the choir!! ::clapping::



Ah shucks! :-[
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Delnorin on October 14, 2011, 06:25:25 AM
My New Idea:

If my dollar buys 30% less than what it did 10 years ago... I think I'll just take 30% off the taxes I have to pay in this year.

Seems fair.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on October 15, 2011, 11:30:09 AM
I haven't taken a tape measure to it, but our family favorite frozen pizza is Tombstone, and it sure as hell looks like they went from 12" to 11", but the price is the same.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Delnorin on October 26, 2011, 07:17:22 AM
Remember the 1970's and 80's videos of Soviet Union grocery stores?

Just wait.

As goes government, so follows the lives of the citizens.

Stay safe Comrades.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 26, 2011, 07:21:46 AM
"Remember the 1970's and 80's videos of Soviet Union grocery stores?"

Empty shelves.

Oh, and don't forget the grains rotting in the fields, that's another hallmark of collectivist control.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on October 26, 2011, 01:34:49 PM
I see the candy companies are advertising "the new minis!" (Reese's p-nut butter cups, for one) as though I'm supposed to believe teeny-tiny is somehow better.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on October 26, 2011, 02:25:59 PM
I see the candy companies are advertising "the new minis!" (Reese's p-nut butter cups, for one) as though I'm supposed to believe teeny-tiny is somehow better.

I make homemade peanut butter cups and I make them as big as I want!   ::whoohoo::

You know what's odd?  The individual-sized packages for candy, Coke, etc are getting bigger but the packages/ bags of several servings are getting smaller.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on October 26, 2011, 09:16:22 PM
A staple in our home is Smuckers raspberry preserves. The last two jars I've noticed something odd, that I'll see as a pattern if it happens a third time. It's thicker; more substantive; less watery.

Now, perhaps one would think that's a good thing. Less filler, more fruit. But the thing is, it's more difficult to spread. You cannot spread as thin a layer on a piece of bread or toast, so it takes more preserves to cover it. I would guess nearly twice as much.

I kinda liked it at the beginning of the first jar (more preserves, num-num), until I started realizing that the food was being depleted much faster than ever before. Once I realized it, I started thinking of the premise of this thread, and wondering....

 ::thinking::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 26, 2011, 09:26:46 PM
Hmmm....could some the additives that made it thinner/smoother be more costly than the fruit and other ingredients?  About the only thing that makes sense.  Sugar and its byproducts are up these past several years.  There has to be an economic reason behind it somewhere.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on October 26, 2011, 09:37:46 PM
Hmmm....could some the additives that made it thinner/smoother be more costly than the fruit and other ingredients?  About the only thing that makes sense.  Sugar and its byproducts are up these past several years.  There has to be an economic reason behind it somewhere.

 Or they figured out a way to up their sales without increasing their customers.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on October 26, 2011, 10:45:27 PM
A staple in our home is Smuckers raspberry preserves. The last two jars I've noticed something odd, that I'll see as a pattern if it happens a third time. It's thicker; more substantive; less watery.

Now, perhaps one would think that's a good thing. Less filler, more fruit. But the thing is, it's more difficult to spread. You cannot spread as thin a layer on a piece of bread or toast, so it takes more preserves to cover it. I would guess nearly twice as much.

I kinda liked it at the beginning of the first jar (more preserves, num-num), until I started realizing that the food was being depleted much faster than ever before. Once I realized it, I started thinking of the premise of this thread, and wondering....

 ::thinking::

I was thrilled with Muir Glen pureed tomatoes about ten years ago; it was so thick it needed a whole can of water per -- to thin it to the proper consistency for "pasta sauce", otherwise known as gravy.

Five years ago, I noticed a radical change in the consistency; much thinner and soupier.

I still buy the brand, but I remain disappointed in the lesser quality.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on October 27, 2011, 02:26:25 AM
A staple in our home is Smuckers raspberry preserves. The last two jars I've noticed something odd, that I'll see as a pattern if it happens a third time. It's thicker; more substantive; less watery.

Smucker's.

I grew up in the South, and though we had another brand (whose name escapes me at the moment), we had apple jelly.  We had apple butter, apple cider, apple vinegar.  Gawd, we  had apple pies.  (Now I love a good PB&J with apple jelly -- and a thin slice of sharp cheddar.)  A lot of food 'apple' being served down South.  Then I move to New York, a well known apple growing state.  What can't I find in grocery stores?  Apple jelly!  The last time I had apple jelly was a Christmas gift mail order of a 12 pack of Smucker's around 4 years ago.  Like 6 apple jellies, 3 apple butters, and 3 of mixed something else.  So here I live in an apple growing state and I have to get apple jelly mail order.  There's a number of grocery stores within walking distance around me, though none of the 'superstore' size.  No apple jelly.  Anywhere.  They all sell Smucker's Mint Apple Jelly, though.  Now who the f-ck buys mint apple jelly?  It most certainly does not make a good PB&J.

Now as to your problem with the thickness, I wish I had a chance to make such a complaint about Smucker's -- or anyone's -- Apple Jelly.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on October 27, 2011, 10:48:14 AM
The ingredients:

Ingredients:

RED RASPBERRIES, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, CORN SYRUP, FRUIT PECTIN, CITRIC ACID.


Corn products are used a lot because they're so cheap.  Perhaps they've increased the corn syrup which is pretty think.  It may only appear to be more fruit because it's thicker and sweeter.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Predator Don on October 27, 2011, 11:12:31 AM
A staple in our home is Smuckers raspberry preserves. The last two jars I've noticed something odd, that I'll see as a pattern if it happens a third time. It's thicker; more substantive; less watery.

Now, perhaps one would think that's a good thing. Less filler, more fruit. But the thing is, it's more difficult to spread. You cannot spread as thin a layer on a piece of bread or toast, so it takes more preserves to cover it. I would guess nearly twice as much.

I kinda liked it at the beginning of the first jar (more preserves, num-num), until I started realizing that the food was being depleted much faster than ever before. Once I realized it, I started thinking of the premise of this thread, and wondering....

 ::thinking::


Ahhh..... Smuckers.


With a name like Smuckers it has to be good.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 27, 2011, 11:15:28 AM
The ingredients:

Ingredients:

RED RASPBERRIES, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, CORN SYRUP, FRUIT PECTIN, CITRIC ACID.


Corn products are used a lot because they're so cheap.  Perhaps they've increased the corn syrup which is pretty think.  It may only appear to be more fruit because it's thicker and sweeter.



I would wager you are correct.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on October 27, 2011, 02:18:22 PM
So to clarify my thought in case it wasn't clear, I'm wondering if Smuckers intentionally thickened the preserves so that people would use more product per serving. That is certainly the result in our house.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on October 27, 2011, 02:43:09 PM
So to clarify my thought in case it wasn't clear, I'm wondering if Smuckers intentionally thickened the preserves so that people would use more product per serving. That is certainly the result in our house.

wouldn't surprise me at all if there was an attempt to do that
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: BMG on November 12, 2011, 05:11:11 PM
http://shine.yahoo.com/shine-food/most-expensive-thanksgiving-dinner-ever-super-savers-guide-180200325.html (http://shine.yahoo.com/shine-food/most-expensive-thanksgiving-dinner-ever-super-savers-guide-180200325.html)

Quote
Can you afford to give thanks this year? The American Farm Bureau Federation is predicting the average 10 person turkey dinner will cost 13 percent more than it did last year. Expect to shell out at least $50 bucks for the average 10 person turkey dinner. That's the highest price for the holiday meal on record.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on November 12, 2011, 05:18:48 PM
http://shine.yahoo.com/shine-food/most-expensive-thanksgiving-dinner-ever-super-savers-guide-180200325.html (http://shine.yahoo.com/shine-food/most-expensive-thanksgiving-dinner-ever-super-savers-guide-180200325.html)

Quote
Can you afford to give thanks this year? The American Farm Bureau Federation is predicting the average 10 person turkey dinner will cost 13 percent more than it did last year. Expect to shell out at least $50 bucks for the average 10 person turkey dinner. That's the highest price for the holiday meal on record.

That's -- average -- $5 a meal.

I've heard this on the "news" twice in as many days.  Funny, I don't remember hearing any such thing during GW's tenure, just the usual, ever present whinging about the pore&starvin' on Thanksgiving so give to the shelters and food banks.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: BMG on November 12, 2011, 08:30:55 PM
It's pretty telling Pan, that under Obama food prices have skyrocketed and the media is largely silent on that fact. And of course, as you point out, under Bush we got to hear all about the poor and starving, etc. Well, they weren't starving nearly as much under Bush as they are under Obama!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Delnorin on November 20, 2011, 10:00:54 PM
Natural Valley Peanut Butter Granola Bars:  We've been buying 1-2 boxes of these every week for over a year now.  My daughter has ciliac disease (complications which came after she acquired Diabetes type I) and these are tasty and one of the very few things she's still allowed to eat.

This week we opened up the box... opened up individual wrapper and.... what the?

They shrank about 3/4 of an inch in length and shrank in both thickness and width.. and there is now only about 1/4 the peanut butter on them as before.

Bah.. just a fluke.. open up the next wrapper.. same... next... same... next.. same.  Boooo!!

Same price though.  Don't want to make us think we're getting screwed up the arse, now do they?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Papa Bear on November 21, 2011, 10:00:50 AM
A staple in our home is Smuckers raspberry preserves. The last two jars I've noticed something odd, that I'll see as a pattern if it happens a third time. It's thicker; more substantive; less watery.

Now, perhaps one would think that's a good thing. Less filler, more fruit. But the thing is, it's more difficult to spread. You cannot spread as thin a layer on a piece of bread or toast, so it takes more preserves to cover it. I would guess nearly twice as much.


Corn syrup makes preserves more spreadable. The cost of corn (syrup) has nearly doubled since 2010. I'd bet that Smuckers has changed the recipe for preserves.
(http://i1177.photobucket.com/albums/x341/PapaBear38/Commodity%20Prices/2011_11WeeklyCornPrices.gif)

There is a triple whammy that is causing the food inflation:

1.) The primary cause is the use of ethanol in our gasoline.
2.) The Fed's devaluation of the dollar (i.e. QE1, QE2, etc.) has caused all fungible commodity prices to increase
3.) More crop land used to produce ethanol = less crop land available for food and more expensive food prices
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on November 21, 2011, 10:30:21 AM
Wonder what sugar cheaper than corn syrup?  I was under the impression that it was cheaper than other forms of sugar.  Perhaps not any more.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on November 21, 2011, 10:35:49 AM
Wonder what sugar cheaper than corn syrup?  I was under the impression that it was cheaper than other forms of sugar.  Perhaps not any more.

It was cheaper than sugar, because the sugar-growers in this country are subsidized (and tariff-protected), until the Feds started doing the same thing with ethanol.

I have no idea if the synthetics are cheaper or not.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on November 21, 2011, 10:58:38 AM

Maybe they'll start using sugar in Dr.Pepper again.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on November 21, 2011, 11:30:28 AM
I want old old coke back!  I don't know what was in that stuff, but it had a damn good bite to it and could clean the rust off of bolts!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Damn_Lucky on November 22, 2011, 05:34:41 PM
Hey RickZ
Quote
Now who the f-ck buys mint apple jelly?  It most certainly does not make a good PB&J.
No but it goes great with Lamb..........NY.........Nuff said.

 ::hysterical::        ::hysterical::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on November 22, 2011, 05:59:20 PM
Lobster cakes size cut by 1/3 at the Lowes Food Deli.  I use them to stuff mushrooms.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: BMG on November 22, 2011, 08:32:58 PM
I bought some Breyers Ice cream yesterday. I usually make my own ice cream so it has been a very long time (maybe 3 years) since I bought ice cream last. We wanted some for a party though and I didn't have time to make any so I just bought some. It used to be that you could by a half gallon for just under six bucks. Now you get a quarter gallon for just over 6 bucks. I would have passed on it and just not had ice cream but they were having a bogo sale on it so I ended up with the amount I was used to at just about the same price.

Still, that was a pretty amazing difference...
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on December 05, 2011, 01:06:49 PM
Smaller grocery bags!

I prefer the brown paper grocery bags.  The plastic ones are just a pain.  Anyway, I realized the other day that several stores around here have switched to smaller paper bags.



It seems to me that even some of the plastic bags are smaller.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on December 05, 2011, 01:51:43 PM
Smaller grocery bags!

I prefer the brown paper grocery bags.  The plastic ones are just a pain.  Anyway, I realized the other day that several stores around here have switched to smaller paper bags.



It seems to me that even some of the plastic bags are smaller.

That's something I've always thought illogical: what's the point of smaller bags when more need to be used in the end? 

Yes, the plastic bags are smaller; been that way around here for a while; too small for a regular size waste-paper basket -- the sides fall in.  I remember when the plastic-type first made their appearance; the things were almost indestructible.  The current ones develop holes on the bottom with almost anything heavier than bread.

I use my own, canvas mostly, and I've got two different sized insulated ones for cold/frozen stuff.  And I bag my own stuff so if the eggs get broken or the bread squashed, I've got myself to blame.

Gunsmith likes Cocoanut Chocolate-Chip cookies; the plastic tray they're arranged in has been enlarged to disguise the fact that the count is down and so is the size of the cookie.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on December 07, 2011, 05:09:29 PM
I use my own, canvas mostly, and I've got two different sized insulated ones for cold/frozen stuff.  And I bag my own stuff so if the eggs get broken or the bread squashed, I've got myself to blame.




I used to use my own way back before it was politically correct.  I hated having all those store bags.  Now my family's larger and I defaulted to the store bags
rather than carry a bunch of canvas bags around. I use the paper bags for a lot of things around the house.

I like to bag my own stuff and try to unless I'm somewhere like Target or Walmart where it's more difficult to do.  At the grocery store I place my items on the conveyer with like items in the order I'd like them bagged.  Only ONE cashier in all the years I've done that has noticed.  She thanked me.  It would go faster if the cashier would bag in the order I have it but nnnooooooooo they have to slow everything down by moving stuff around and going out of their way to mess it all up.

My daughter wanted to know why I bother.  I can't help myself. I can't stick a jug of milk next to the eggs..that's asking for trouble.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on December 07, 2011, 07:12:27 PM
I use my own, canvas mostly, and I've got two different sized insulated ones for cold/frozen stuff.  And I bag my own stuff so if the eggs get broken or the bread squashed, I've got myself to blame.




I used to use my own way back before it was politically correct.  I hated having all those store bags.  Now my family's larger and I defaulted to the store bags
rather than carry a bunch of canvas bags around. I use the paper bags for a lot of things around the house.

I like to bag my own stuff and try to unless I'm somewhere like Target or Walmart where it's more difficult to do.  At the grocery store I place my items on the conveyer with like items in the order I'd like them bagged.  Only ONE cashier in all the years I've done that has noticed.  She thanked me.  It would go faster if the cashier would bag in the order I have it but nnnooooooooo they have to slow everything down by moving stuff around and going out of their way to mess it all up.

My daughter wanted to know why I bother.  I can't help myself. I can't stick a jug of milk next to the eggs..that's asking for trouble.


See, this is why we get along.  I do exactly the same thing and I load the cart in that order as well; heavy, bulky things first, more numerous small/fragile/lighter items last.

Gunsmith often bags while I load the conveyer when we shop together and he's got it down too, even though he still laughingly calls me "The Lone Arranger".
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Damn_Lucky on December 07, 2011, 07:30:00 PM
Well somebody has to take the blame.
 ::hysterical::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on December 07, 2011, 10:43:27 PM
Even with my miniscule shops, in comparison to those with families, I arrange on the conveyer.  Yep, heavy stuff at first, milk, juice, canned goods and the like.  Then the vegetables and assorted small other stuff.  Refrigerated forms its own section, meats, butter, yogurt, etc. Then eggs and bread.  I agree about the milk/egg problem, LV; the only thing I allow them to put with eggs is a loaf of bread on top of the carton.  Commissary shops as a kid taught me the basic lessons of arranging for packing to carry as well as having certain items together for easy shelving at home (be it refrigerator, freezer or nearby pantry).

I guess this is one of those d'oh! moments for me as I never considered NOT arranging grocery items on the conveyer.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on December 07, 2011, 10:54:45 PM
I see.  We are the minority of "nut-jobs".  Unless others want to confess, in which case we may find we are in the majority of "what?!  you mean you don't?!"
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on December 07, 2011, 11:10:07 PM

The major problem with that is checkers
and sackers who can't get with the program.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on December 07, 2011, 11:34:33 PM

The major problem with that is checkers
and sackers who can't get with the program.


What program?  This stuff is self-taught by practical thinkers, few of which abide in grocery checkout lines, and so this leaves out corporate and business concern-eds who are more worried by potential sexual harassment and racial discrimination complainants than broken-egg-ed customers.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on December 08, 2011, 12:03:05 AM

OK. I don't understand what you said.
I was trying to say that I place items, in similar order
as y'all on the conveyor and they invariably screw it. 

I always place cold and frozen items together and at that time
make note to the checker and sacker that I want all cold items
together in plastic and the rest in paper.  That's not difficult is it?
Ha!



Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Delnorin on December 08, 2011, 01:38:42 AM
I see.  We are the minority of "nut-jobs".  Unless others want to confess, in which case we may find we are in the majority of "what?!  you mean you don't?!"

Oh yeah.. I totally do the arranging as well... I have the young kids move aside and I pack my own as well.  The only stickler is Walmart.. where the register person loads the bags because there are no counters on the exit side of the scanner.. just straight into the bags.. which blow.  5 plastic bags = 1 properly packed paper bag.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on December 08, 2011, 07:10:29 AM
I understand the allure of paper over plastic as it is a small but doable 'green' policy; I even have one of those canvas sacks with handles, which is only good enough for one meal shopping -- and no extras like paper towels.  Paper bags can also be used as a cooking vessel/kitchen utensil (baking chicken in an oven or filled with powdered sugar and shaken so the zeppolis can be properly coated) and plastic cannot, so there is that, too.  But, and this is a big but, being a full-time pedestrian, plastic bags with handles are the only way to go.  In fact, none of my neighborhood grocery stores ever has to bother asking 'Paper or plastic?' as there is only one choice.  Living alone creating little garbage and with a garbage chute being just down the hall, I re-use the plastic bags for garbage bags, saving a few bucks and 'recycling' at the same time, though I don't think that's what 'they' had in mind when they started pushing the concept of recycling.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on December 08, 2011, 07:35:42 AM

OK. I don't understand what you said.
I was trying to say that I place items, in similar order
as y'all on the conveyor and they invariably screw it.

Oh, sorry; I was just riffing off what you said about getting "with the program" and off into my own disgust that the people who bag are no longer taught how to properly do so, as corporate HQ's focus is on other issues.

Quote
I always place cold and frozen items together and at that time
make note to the checker and sacker that I want all cold items
together in plastic and the rest in paper.  That's not difficult is it?
Ha!


Yep, that how we do it too, but I guess it is too difficult for some cashier folks to figure out by themselves.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on December 08, 2011, 07:42:59 AM
We also arrange things on the conveyor according to a preferred system. Gallon milk jugs, large juice containers, and other heavy items like a sack o' 'taters, bag of apples, large peanut-butter, case of soda-pop/bottled water, etc - those all get placed in the cart in a way that they are easily accessible first when it's time to load the conveyor. Rule #1: No heavy stuff crushing other items when the conveyor crams things together.

Canned items are next onto the belt. Then boxed and bagged items, keeping frozen and refrigerated items together. Unpackaged produce, chips, eggs, and bread go on last.

We prefer to bag ourselves, as the baggers inevitably do it illogically. When we DO end up at a store with a bagger, pet peave: baggers leave as many things out of sacks as possible. Milk jugs can easily be packed two-to-a-bag, and the bag WON'T break unless you mishandle it. But they put the jugs in the cart solo and I have to take them out and bag them myself. 6-packs of Gatorade, or any container with a handle - they don't bag those either. I'm interested in as few trips from the Excursion as possible when unloading at home. 4 Gatorade 6-packs, 2 OJs, and 4 gallons of milk, can either be 10 separate items to wrestle with, or 5 bags. I prefer 5 bags. Bagger-boy doesn't see it that way.

We use a mixture of plastic and paper sacks, as both come in handy at home.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on December 09, 2011, 02:12:51 PM
 ::danceban:: ::danceban:: ::danceban::

once again it's proven I'm hanging out with the right group

 ::grouphug::


nice to know I'm not the only one who sees the logic of loading the cart, conveyor and bags in the correct order

and I must admit to feeling a bit guilty when the cashier thanks me for bagging because I'm doing it because 1) she's too slow and 2) I want my stuff bagged properly
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on December 09, 2011, 02:21:13 PM
Yes, you are.

I look at being thanked for bagging as just one of life's little happy ironies.

She'd rather not do it and I'd rather she not do it; it's a win/win, really.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on December 09, 2011, 03:09:18 PM
Yes, you are.

I look at being thanked for bagging as just one of life's little happy ironies.

She'd rather not do it and I'd rather she not do it; it's a win/win, really.

that it is!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: warpmine on February 12, 2012, 04:33:09 PM
Have you noticed that soy is in virtually everything these days? Can't by any premixed foods because of it.

If only the producers of the staples we usually purchase would have stood their ground and just raised the prices instead of shrinking the container, people could have seen first hand at what was transpiring. The value of the almighty dollar is fictional at best and the people needed to see what was happening but instead the manufacturers just helped the government pull the wool over our eyes. ::outrage::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on February 12, 2012, 04:44:10 PM
Have you noticed that soy is in virtually everything these days? Can't by any premixed foods because of it.

If only the producers of the staples we usually purchase would have stood their ground and just raised the prices instead of shrinking the container, people could have seen first hand at what was transpiring. The value of the almighty dollar is fictional at best and the people needed to see what was happening but instead the manufacturers just helped the government pull the wool over our eyes. ::outrage::

We stay away from most pre-mixed food because of all the crap, including soy, that's in it.  Surely you've taken a look at the ingredient list on bread these days, despite the delicious bread that can be made of flour, salt, yeast and water.  Period.

And as to your second point, I agree; I'd rather the prices had been raised instead of "hiding" the smaller amount of the item via the packaging.

Around Christmas, I noticed Reese's advertising the "Now NEW Reese's Minis" (teeny-size peanut butter cups), and "with no wrapping!", like they were a such a novelty.  Lemme see:  a lot less candy in each piece and no wrapping to boot; yea! what a concept!  Are people so lazy as to not want to have to be *burdened* with having to undo the wrapper and/or having done so, having to eat the whole thing?  Because it's not like a regular sized Reese's Cup is more than one bite anymore either.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on February 12, 2012, 06:38:49 PM
We went to one of our favorite restaurants with another couple last night. The four of us usually try to double-date there once or twice a year, and we've been doing it for several years. We all universally settled on the garlic-parmesan crusted shrimp appetizer after the first time we went there together, and it is a tradition now that we start the meal off sharing that. Last night the portion was halved, but the price was basically the same as it has always been.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on February 12, 2012, 07:10:37 PM
Have you noticed that soy is in virtually everything these days? Can't by any premixed foods because of it.

If only the producers of the staples we usually purchase would have stood their ground and just raised the prices instead of shrinking the container, people could have seen first hand at what was transpiring. The value of the almighty dollar is fictional at best and the people needed to see what was happening but instead the manufacturers just helped the government pull the wool over our eyes. ::outrage::

We stay away from most pre-mixed food because of all the crap, including soy, that's in it.  Surely you've taken a look at the ingredient list on bread these days, despite the delicious bread that can be made of flour, salt, yeast and water.  Period.

And as to your second point, I agree; I'd rather the prices had been raised instead of "hiding" the smaller amount of the item via the packaging.

Around Christmas, I noticed Reese's advertising the "Now NEW Reese's Minis" (teeny-size peanut butter cups), and "with no wrapping!", like they were a such a novelty.  Lemme see:  a lot less candy in each piece and no wrapping to boot; yea! what a concept!  Are people so lazy as to not want to have to be *burdened* with having to undo the wrapper and/or having done so, having to eat the whole thing?  Because it's not like a regular sized Reese's Cup is more than one bite anymore either.

I was at a friend's house one day sharing a laugh about our kids' expectations when I said my kids will say there's nothing to eat when the pantry is stuffed to the gills because they're in too much of a hurry to make anything. She laughed and said she knew what I meant and flung open her pantry to reveal what looked to me like a grocery store--it was jam packed with boxes of prepared "foods" that all one had to do was microwave.  I'd never seen anyone's home shelves that full of stuff like that.

I didn't say anything but when I say my kids would have 'to make" it I meant it.
If we'd been at my home when I opened my pantry she would have seen food that you actually have to cook to eat. Beans, rice, noodles, flour, sugar,etc.....

I joke with my kids (but only just) that I hate cooking but I refuse to eat or serve the crap they sell in pretty little packages.

Speaking of bread, what exactly is a "dough conditioner"?  One would think it's the two hands I use to mix and knead.

Pan, you mentioned the mini Reeses a few months ago and I can't see a commerical without thinking of you.  :)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on February 12, 2012, 09:02:49 PM
Quote
Speaking of bread, what exactly is a "dough conditioner"?  One would think it's the two hands I use to mix and knead.

 ::rolllaughing::

Gee.  I dunno what my Grandmother did without "dough conditioner", having to do a weekly bread-bake for FOURTEEN.

Quote
Pan, you mentioned the mini Reeses a few months ago and I can't see a commerical without thinking of you.  Smiley

I hope they're happy thoughts.   ;D
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on February 12, 2012, 09:04:38 PM


Quote
Pan, you mentioned the mini Reeses a few months ago and I can't see a commerical without thinking of you.  Smiley

I hope they're happy thoughts.   ;D
[/quote]


Of course!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: warpmine on February 13, 2012, 10:56:12 AM
We stay away from most pre-mixed food because of all the crap, including soy, that's in it.  Surely you've taken a look at the ingredient list on bread these days, despite the delicious bread that can be made of flour, salt, yeast and water.  Period.

And as to your second point, I agree; I'd rather the prices had been raised instead of "hiding" the smaller amount of the item via the packaging.

Around Christmas, I noticed Reese's advertising the "Now NEW Reese's Minis" (teeny-size peanut butter cups), and "with no wrapping!", like they were a such a novelty.  Lemme see:  a lot less candy in each piece and no wrapping to boot; yea! what a concept!  Are people so lazy as to not want to have to be *burdened* with having to undo the wrapper and/or having done so, having to eat the whole thing?  Because it's not like a regular sized Reese's Cup is more than one bite anymore either.
[/quote]
I suppose those unwrapped candy pieces are especially inviting now that you do not have to use tweezers to pull any wrapping off. Reeses has always been a favorite. I have bee reluctant to buy anything with the smaller packaging unless a coupon is available with a special sale because I just hate getting ripped off. More to the point I hate buying smaller packaged goods for the "same" price as larger package.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 05, 2012, 07:43:03 AM
I guess somebody woke the hell up and visited a grocery store for the first time since coming out of the coma...

Food inflation seen back on the table as prices rise
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/04/food-fao-idUSL6E8F42J520120404 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/04/food-fao-idUSL6E8F42J520120404)

Oh, the UN, that explains the coma...

 ::)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 05, 2012, 09:51:47 AM
Since January I've noticed price jumps of 50 cents to a dollar at a time on items.  No few cents here and there.  A few months ago I went to buy a spice in jar that I buy fairly often for 2.99.  I'd bought it in December and discovered that in January it was now 3.99.  Then I noticed they had raised all their spices by a dollar.  Since then I've seen the same thing on a number of things I regularly purchase.

However, soda products like Pepsi and Coke seem to always be on sale at the stores I go to.  Corn syrup must still be cheap.


Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: trapeze on April 05, 2012, 10:02:34 AM
Pepsi is almost always on sale where I live. Coke, not so much. Plus they advertise global warming/save the polar bear crap on their products now so screw them.

The increase in the cost of everything (but especially food) is going to have a very definite effect on the way that people behave in the coming months. I would look to dramatic changes in summer vacation plans. There is also going to be a big hit on Christmas season shopping trends.

People are going to be forced to do more with less...spending less because of the need to deal with the necessities of life. Less disposable income. Which will lead to a loss of employment...which will drive down GDP...which will begin the second recession.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 05, 2012, 11:31:19 AM
In my neck of the woods the price of meat has really shot up the past several months.

I agree Trap that there are a lot of ripples left to go through industries, this recession is not ending anytime soon.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: BMG on May 01, 2012, 12:25:31 PM
So at our house we buy dish soap once a year (there's a sale we take advantage of in our area that happens once a year). Anyway, last year the bottles of dish soap came in 10.3 oz sizes for $.99. This year, from the same company and for the same price we get 9.0 oz bottles. We still have two bottles left over from last year and are therefore, able to directly compare the bottles.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on May 01, 2012, 01:24:06 PM
I suspect a lot of people don't notice -- or think something is fishy, but aren't sure of what -- if they've no previously purchased spare on hand for comparison purposes or unless they're deliberately paying close attention.

I get huge bundles of toilet tissue from BJ's and I just recently noticed that while the rolls are just as fat, they're not as wide.  Stood side by side, the newer rolls are about half an inch shorter.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on May 01, 2012, 03:15:49 PM
 And yet the economy is doing better.   ::danceban:: ::danceban:: ::danceban::

/


Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on May 01, 2012, 07:12:50 PM
And yet the economy is doing better.   ::danceban:: ::danceban:: ::danceban::

/




 If you don't include food and fuel in saying that.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on May 02, 2012, 07:05:21 AM
And yet the economy is doing better.   ::danceban:: ::danceban:: ::danceban::

/




 If you don't include food and fuel in saying that.

Ahh yes, what the Leading Indicators of the Economy (LIE) say are non-essentials to the official calculation!

Apparently they think we all are as stupid as some of us look!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: warpmine on May 03, 2012, 06:19:09 AM
And yet the economy is doing better.   ::danceban:: ::danceban:: ::danceban::

/




 If you don't include food and fuel in saying that.

Ahh yes, what the Leading Indicators of the Economy (LIE) say are non-essentials to the official calculation!

Apparently they think we all are as stupid as some of us look!

That's because most of Us are that stupid. Those of us that aren't to bright look to the government to tell us the truth rather than look at what's left in their wallet.....oh wait, I mean government issued food card. If they had to work for that money they would revolt and we all know why they are firmly planted in the government's pouch.....handouts, if they stop getting them then they'd have to fend for themselves. The regime knows this fact well and will continue to fund until the RINO's grow a set. ::gaah::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on May 03, 2012, 07:05:48 AM
Yeah, not going to hold my breath on that RINO set-growing thing!

 ::unknowncomic::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: BMG on May 03, 2012, 08:05:27 AM
Yeah, not going to hold my breath on that RINO set-growing thing!

 ::unknowncomic::

Quite right, because a RINO is nothing more than a progressive with an (R) next to its name. It wants the exact same thing as a progressive with (D) next to its name - only it wants to do it a bit more slowly that then (D).
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on May 03, 2012, 10:51:05 AM
Yeah, not going to hold my breath on that RINO set-growing thing!

 ::unknowncomic::

Quite right, because a RINO is nothing more than a progressive with an (R) next to its name. It wants the exact same thing as a progressive with (D) next to its name - only it wants to do it a bit more slowly that then (D).

Yeah.  Did ya catch my update to the "Forward" thread?  You might be interested to hear Romney's words...   ::)

http://itsaboutliberty.com/index.php/topic,5685.0.html (http://itsaboutliberty.com/index.php/topic,5685.0.html)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on June 08, 2012, 05:19:08 PM
The King is Dead! Long Live Federal Nutrition Standards? (http://cnsnews.com/blog/eric-scheiner/king-dead-long-live-federal-nutrition-standards)

Quote
The news is out – the king is dead. The king size Snickers bar will no longer be offered after 2013 as candy company Mars Inc. decides to voluntarily discontinue bars over 250 calories.

It’s all part of the fight against obesity. That’s also the reasoning behind the Walt Disney Company‘s announcement with Michelle Obama this week that only foods aligning closer to federal guidelines will be advertised on it’s channels starting in 2015.

Of course, this is the company that offers the “Kitchen Sink” treat at its resorts.

A treat that features hot fudge, butterscotch, peanut butter, 8 scoops of ice cream, cookies, cake, chocolate syrup, a whole can of whipped cream and so much more.

It’s interesting that a company that offers a sweet treat of this magnitude wants it’s advertisers to offer food aligned with federal standards in order to advertise on Disney stations.

I wonder what would inspire them to do that? It’s like telling certain presidential candidates that the individual mandate in their health care plans won’t work, but then putting an individual mandate in your presidential plan.

Isn’t it?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: EW1(SG) on June 08, 2012, 06:25:05 PM
Since January I've noticed price jumps of 50 cents to a dollar at a time on items.  No few cents here and there.  A few months ago I went to buy a spice in jar that I buy fairly often for 2.99.  I'd bought it in December and discovered that in January it was now 3.99.  Then I noticed they had raised all their spices by a dollar.  Since then I've seen the same thing on a number of things I regularly purchase.

However, soda products like Pepsi and Coke seem to always be on sale at the stores I go to.  Corn syrup must still be cheap.

Corn syrup is delivered by rail car, which is still a considerably cheaper method of transport for bulk items like that (when convenient to a railway) than trucks (which can go anywhere, albeit with smaller loads).  And sodas aren't much more than syrup and water...so as long as corn syrup is relatively inexpensive...  And things that travel by truck are going to continue skyrocketing in price until the damage done by O!bamao is undone...which could be decades.


Corn syrup is also one of the items used as a "dough conditioner."  When making large batches of baked items like bread, some of the things we do by hand in our own kitchens don't scale particularly well, and kneading dough to the perfect plasticity is one of them.  So some of the ingredients have to be adjusted or something else used to compensate for the changes is scale.  What amazes me is that large scale producers are able to continue producing relatively stable products even though everything from the farm to the factory has changed tremendously in since WWII.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on June 08, 2012, 06:29:00 PM
I don't eat candy bars and I'm tempted to go buy a bunch of giant Snickers. 

Call me cynical but I don't believe the people behind all this healthy eating really care what we eat -- they just like telling others what to do.

I don't think people are fat because they eat candy bars.  They're fat because they don't get any exercise and I don't mean gym membership exercise.  I mean they aren't outside mowing the lawn or playing catch with the kids or trimming the shrubs. IMHO--that's what I see in my own family.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on June 08, 2012, 06:44:34 PM

It takes corporate a long period of time to get from should we to
the announcement that it's a done deal.  If they were still in the
planning phase they would say forgetaboutit.

Mars with the smaller candy, Ford with its migetidiot cars (and no
more Grand Marquis), McDonalds phasing out the kiddy meals and
playpens planned for the worst (reelection) and implemented them.
Now we are stuck with a lesser world unless Romney goes full bore
and assures (by deed) corporates and independents he is on their
side.  Pray for Romney.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: EW1(SG) on June 09, 2012, 07:02:29 AM
I don't eat candy bars and I'm tempted to go buy a bunch of giant Snickers. 

Call me cynical but I don't believe the people behind all this healthy eating really care what we eat -- they just like telling others what to do.

I don't think people are fat because they eat candy bars.  They're fat because they don't get any exercise and I don't mean gym membership exercise.  I mean they aren't outside mowing the lawn or playing catch with the kids or trimming the shrubs. IMHO--that's what I see in my own family.

The liking to tell other people what to do is a far greater factor in "federal nutrition guidelines" than is scientific knowledge.

Take salt, or "sodium" if you prefer.  An absolutely essential component of our diet, and we have been harangued to consume less for decades, even knowing that half the population will have an increase in their blood pressure if they do so.

And that effect can change as people age~so somebody who used to benefit from a moderate sodium intake could benefit later from a reduced intake, or vice versa.

So, the moral of the story is, if you are going to eat concrete, you'd best do it before it sets, and I would recommend some fiber with that.  Other than that, I don't have any real dietary recommendations that make sense for you...but I know a lot about what I need to eat to keep ME healthy.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: IronDioPriest on August 10, 2012, 11:45:34 AM
Hanes Comfort Fit Men's tagless briefs.

I've worn the same brand underwear for well over a decade. On things like that, when I find something I like, I don't experiment with alternatives. I picked up a couple packs of these briefs a couple weeks ago, and they're different. I have old pairs to compare, and the differences are obvious.

The fabric is thinner and more brittle. I don't know if they changed the cotton, the weave, the thread thickness, the blend, or what, but this brand used to be a very soft supple cotton blend, and now the fabric is more coarse and thin.

Also, the waistband used to be about an inch wide. Now it is about a 1/2 inch to 3/5 inch. So not only does every pair have elastic that is less wide, the material needed to wrap around the elastic to sew it into the waistband is also consequently less.

Do I like them less? Yes, nominally so. Once they're on, I forget about it, but putting them on doesn't feel the same. It's not a deal-breaker, but I'm reminded every time I put on a pair that I'm getting less product for more money. If the way they are now was what people wanted to own, they wouldn't ever have made them the old way. This is purely an answer to declining consumer purchasing power. The Hanes company understands that in regard to underwear, men are willing to settle for less product at a steady price rather than spend more money for the same thing.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on August 10, 2012, 01:00:07 PM
Women's Gold Toe cotton socks are not the same now either, and for the same reasons I suppose; they're thinner and the foot itself stretches out after a few washings.

If you can do so, I suggest some stashing of the socks/underwear/undershirts too, because the quality will only get worse.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on August 10, 2012, 03:56:56 PM
Quote
The Hanes company understands that in regard to underwear, men are willing to settle for less product at a steady price rather than spend more money for the same thing.

Ii don't know if that is so much an understanding as it is a calculation. What I do know is that those "willing to settle" always end up getting shorted - on both points.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on September 19, 2012, 11:50:27 AM
Get your bulk orders of freeze-dried in!

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/prepare-15-food-price-surge-rabobank-warns (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/prepare-15-food-price-surge-rabobank-warns)

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on September 19, 2012, 12:29:21 PM
Get your bulk orders of freeze-dried in!

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/prepare-15-food-price-surge-rabobank-warns (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/prepare-15-food-price-surge-rabobank-warns)



thanks for the reminder.  I'd heard this on the radio but with my husband in the hospital I hadn't got to place an order. It's on my list for this afternoon.  With two adult kids moved back home I never feel like I have enough food stocked up.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on October 18, 2012, 10:22:13 AM
Food for thought (pun intended).

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/not-just-gas-check-out-the-drastic-price-increases-on-these-21-everyday-items/ (http://www.theblaze.com/stories/not-just-gas-check-out-the-drastic-price-increases-on-these-21-everyday-items/)

Quote
Not Just Gas! Check Out the Drastic Price Increases on These 21 Everyday Items


Tuesday’s presidential debate touched on some massive economic issues that are affecting all Americans. The immense increase in gas prices was a crucial part of the discussion, but have other everyday products seen a drastic increased in price over the same time period?  According to Blaze research on data provided by the the Bureau of Labor Statistics* gas prices are not alone in skyrocketing over the last decade.  Wait till you see chocolate chip cookies!

(http://www.theblaze.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/375442-gas_can-med_large1.jpg)
 
Gasoline [all types]
 
2002 Average – $1.44
 2012  Average- $3.73
 Percent Increase:
 
158%

The other 20 are at the link.  Forget the chocolate chip cookies (you know what I mean), check out the margarine tub price %age increase.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on October 18, 2012, 10:31:19 AM
Dang!  Looking at that steak made me hungry.

Amazing -- NOT -- that food and fuel is not counted in the Consumer Price Index calculations for inflation.  Anybody who hits the grocery stores on a regular basis can tell you everything is more expensive -- okay, except for strawberries.  I cannot nevermind chocolate chip cookies (Gunsmith is a cookie monster) and the cookies have shrunk, there are less of them in the package and the price is up by more than a third.

And an added "benefit" is as the prices go up, so do the amount of sales taxes paid.

And Obongo's blather during the debate on gas prices just goes to show how truly moronic he is.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 18, 2012, 12:12:29 PM
Remember backm in the Bush years people's big gripe was the high cost of milk, yup evil Georgie Bush killin' us and endangering our kids cause milk is so expensive.

Umm, a gallon of milk, a product still rising in price, is still cheaper than a gallon of gas!

We should be beating the living crap out of Obama 24/7/365 on gas and food!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on October 18, 2012, 12:15:35 PM
Steak?! Who the heck can afford steak?!!

As for me - I'm lusting after that gas can. Have any of you purchased a portable gas can lately? The insanity that they imposed on fuel dispensing nozzles (supposedly zero emission but in truth zero usefulness nozzles) has now been inflicted on gas cans. Now they have these snouts that are impossible to pour from. You're required to hold the handle with one hand, tip the can with your other hand and hold the nozzle open with your third hand.

no wait...
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on October 18, 2012, 12:17:48 PM

Good shopping could find canned goods from .50 to .79 NOW the minimum is .79 with over $1.00 is common.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on October 18, 2012, 12:35:39 PM

Good shopping could find canned goods from .50 to .79 NOW the minimum is .79 with over $1.00 is common.


Yep.  And sometimes there was a 3/1.00 sale.  I don't buy canned goods much these days---I usually buy dry beans or frozen vegetables.  However, a few weeks ago I went shopping to buy something for the local food pantry.  I had a budget to stick to and wanted to really maximize what I gave.  I was shocked at the price of canned goods. 
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 18, 2012, 02:52:24 PM
Remember, the goobermint says that unless you drive or buy food there is NO inflation?  Now, dontchya just feel so much better?!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on October 18, 2012, 05:15:14 PM
Steak?! Who the heck can afford steak?!!

As for me - I'm lusting after that gas can. Have any of you purchased a portable gas can lately? The insanity that they imposed on fuel dispensing nozzles (supposedly zero emission but in truth zero usefulness nozzles) has now been inflicted on gas cans. Now they have these snouts that are impossible to pour from. You're required to hold the handle with one hand, tip the can with your other hand and hold the nozzle open with your third hand.

no wait...

 I go for used ones at garage sales.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on October 18, 2012, 05:44:42 PM

JF, you're a genius.  In Wal Mart the other day, $16., no way.  I'm saved.

Soup, I think Glock has a fix for those special cans.

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on October 18, 2012, 05:46:33 PM
Actually I have a nice (and growing) collection of containers that I regularly find on the roadside  ;D
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on October 21, 2012, 06:42:45 AM
This may not be food inflation/smaller packaging per se, but it still got my attention -- in a negative way.

Saturday, I bought some Ball Park Angus hot dogs on sale for $3.99 (on friggin' sale, mind you).  I decided to look at the hot dog buns.  For a package of 8, maybe a pound, maybe 12 oz., the price was $3.69.  A package of hot dog buns is only $.30 cheaper than a pound of (supposed) meat!  Needless to say, now you know why I use one slice of bread for a hot dog bun, placing the dog at an angle and folding the bread over it, like a misshapen taco.  I am not going to pay that price for a special bread just to hold a hot dog.  Just won't do it.  Besides, I can use the bread for other things, and it was 'only' $2.50 for 24 oz.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on October 21, 2012, 11:07:13 AM
This may not be food inflation/smaller packaging per se, but it still got my attention -- in a negative way.

Saturday, I bought some Ball Park Angus hot dogs on sale for $3.99 (on friggin' sale, mind you).  I decided to look at the hot dog buns.  For a package of 8, maybe a pound, maybe 12 oz., the price was $3.69.  A package of hot dog buns is only $.30 cheaper than a pound of (supposed) meat!  Needless to say, now you know why I use one slice of bread for a hot dog bun, placing the dog at an angle and folding the bread over it, like a misshapen taco.  I am not going to pay that price for a special bread just to hold a hot dog.  Just won't do it.  Besides, I can use the bread for other things, and it was 'only' $2.50 for 24 oz.

Wow, I thought I was the only one who refused to pay that kinda price for friggin hot dog buns!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on October 21, 2012, 06:09:51 PM
This may not be food inflation/smaller packaging per se, but it still got my attention -- in a negative way.

Saturday, I bought some Ball Park Angus hot dogs on sale for $3.99 (on friggin' sale, mind you).  I decided to look at the hot dog buns.  For a package of 8, maybe a pound, maybe 12 oz., the price was $3.69.  A package of hot dog buns is only $.30 cheaper than a pound of (supposed) meat!  Needless to say, now you know why I use one slice of bread for a hot dog bun, placing the dog at an angle and folding the bread over it, like a misshapen taco.  I am not going to pay that price for a special bread just to hold a hot dog.  Just won't do it.  Besides, I can use the bread for other things, and it was 'only' $2.50 for 24 oz.

Wow, I thought I was the only one who refused to pay that kinda price for friggin hot dog buns!

  You're not alone.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Predator Don on October 21, 2012, 06:59:20 PM
You guys can afford hotdogs?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on October 22, 2012, 02:10:07 AM
You guys can afford hotdogs?

On sale only.  Like bacon.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 22, 2012, 07:09:59 AM
Mmm!  Bacon!   ::whoohoo::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on October 22, 2012, 12:25:39 PM
You guys can afford hotdogs?

On sale only.  Like bacon.

Bacon?! I remember bacon!

(barely)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on October 22, 2012, 08:09:34 PM
You guys can afford hotdogs?

On sale only.  Like bacon.

Bacon?! I remember bacon!

(barely)

   I wait for sales ans strike hard other than that I have learned to wait for it to go on sale and hopefully have coupons at hand.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on October 28, 2012, 10:03:06 AM
Okay, bought a container of black peppercorns Friday.  I was running low, but not out, so I had the old container.  I last bought peppercorns, oh, it must be well over 2 years ago.  A 14 oz. container a few years back cost $4.99.  On Friday, the same brand and the same weight was $6.99, a whopping 40% increase for a non-perishable.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on October 28, 2012, 11:57:01 AM
You ferreted out the hidden cost of Neo-Keynesian buggery, the FEMA camp will remedy such lawlessness.

 :P
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on October 28, 2012, 02:47:22 PM
I think Pan mentioned the pasta noodles awhile back but it still annoys me I can't always get a 16 oz bag. Yesterday, I picked up the penne bag and see it's 13.5 oz.  I did find some that were 16 oz but you have to spend 5 fricking minutes comparing unit prices on pasta.  They all used to be 16 oz and you just pick up the cheapest if you wanted.



Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on October 28, 2012, 03:11:42 PM
AhA!  Unit pricing!

Another bugaboo of mine is Bounty paper towel unit pricing.  I get mine at BJ's, the big multipacks.  Bounty has five or six different types and conglomerations of paper towels -- regular, jumbo and select-a-size (half sheet) rolls, plain and printed = all different prices per unit (sheet) -- so I check the unit pricing for each.  The select-a-size is by far the cheapest per unit, but that's because the unit-pricing for them is by the half-sheet.

Then there are the sales on anything, when the posted unit price applies to the non-sale price, so I'm left doing the math in my head in order to figure out if the sale price is still a "bargain" when compared to other brands.

I really dislike shopping these days.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on October 28, 2012, 03:47:13 PM

I reduce it to $ per sq ft.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on October 28, 2012, 03:50:02 PM

I reduce it to $ per sq ft.


The unit pricing at least does some of the math work.  If I was to do it your way, every time I went to the store (because the prices keep going up) I may as well bring the pocket calculator.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: charlesoakwood on October 28, 2012, 04:10:07 PM

Yeah, the ladies look at me with the calculator and give that "he's a newbie" smile.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on October 28, 2012, 04:13:05 PM

Yeah, the ladies look at me with the calculator and give that "he's a newbie" smile.


I don't know what they're smiling about.  The prices keep changing, so it's a new round of time-consuming calculations every shopping trip.  What they, as "old-timers", figured out last time may not apply this time or the next.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on October 28, 2012, 08:01:16 PM
AhA!  Unit pricing!

Another bugaboo of mine is Bounty paper towel unit pricing.  I get mine at BJ's, the big multipacks.  Bounty has five or six different types and conglomerations of paper towels -- regular, jumbo and select-a-size (half sheet) rolls, plain and printed = all different prices per unit (sheet) -- so I check the unit pricing for each.  The select-a-size is by far the cheapest per unit, but that's because the unit-pricing for them is by the half-sheet.

Then there are the sales on anything, when the posted unit price applies to the non-sale price, so I'm left doing the math in my head in order to figure out if the sale price is still a "bargain" when compared to other brands.

I really dislike shopping these days.

 BJs takes coupons. But the last load of paper towels I bought were at local drug store because the gave me a 10 dollar gift card if I bout 30.bucks worth of certain items,so I bough paper towels and then I for a coupn that doubled my discounts so my 10 bucks turned into 20 and I cleaned up.


 It will be a cold day in hell before that happpens again.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on August 08, 2013, 09:44:19 PM
toilet paper!!!   ::outrage::

if I see one more package that says it's a "double roll" I may scream

if I divide that roll in half it will not be what I used to buy

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on August 09, 2013, 12:07:17 AM
toilet paper!!!   ::outrage::

if I see one more package that says it's a "double roll" I may scream

if I divide that roll in half it will not be what I used to buy

Johnsonville Brats:  five for the price of six, formerly.

Bacon's almost five bucks per pound except when it's on sale, and for the really cheap stuff that disappears into mostly grease when cooked.  And I save the bacon grease anyway.

The season for eggs is good.  I've a friend who supplies fresh brown eggs for $3 per 18 count while the laying is good -- and the eggs are goooood -- and I give him all the kitchen refuse -- vegetable rottens/peelings -- that I accumulate; what one would normally compost.  Win-win.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: RickZ on November 20, 2013, 09:19:54 AM
Bought a box of Ritz crackers this morning.  The one pound box has now shrunk to 13.7 oz.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pablo de Fleurs on November 20, 2013, 09:24:47 AM
toilet paper!!!   ::outrage::

if I see one more package that says it's a "double roll" I may scream

if I divide that roll in half it will not be what I used to buy

That's because people use more than a square per day. That will change when the ACA is fully implemented.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: oldcoastie6468 on November 20, 2013, 10:34:39 AM
You guys can afford hotdogs?

Yeah, once in a while. We like only Hebrew National hot dogs, though.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: oldcoastie6468 on November 20, 2013, 10:36:27 AM

I reduce it to $ per sq ft.


The unit pricing at least does some of the math work.  If I was to do it your way, every time I went to the store (because the prices keep going up) I may as well bring the pocket calculator.

Many cell phones, if you have one, also contain calculators.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on November 20, 2013, 11:35:56 AM
toilet paper!!!   ::outrage::

if I see one more package that says it's a "double roll" I may scream

if I divide that roll in half it will not be what I used to buy

That's because people use more than a square per day. That will change when the ACA is fully implemented.

free bidets for everyone!

The bidet populates bathrooms all over Asia, South America and Europe but has mostly been a source of bad jokes in the U.S. Now, increased demand spurred by foreigners planting roots is breaking down the barrier for the toilet-like fixture.
 (http://www.onenewspage.com/video/20131115/1498118/Bidets-Catch-on-in-Luxury-Homes.htm)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on November 20, 2013, 11:54:06 AM
It's like the three shells...I don't know how that works, pretty sure I don't need to...
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on November 20, 2013, 02:32:54 PM
toilet paper!!!   ::outrage::

if I see one more package that says it's a "double roll" I may scream

if I divide that roll in half it will not be what I used to buy

That's because people use more than a square per day. That will change when the ACA is fully implemented.

free bidets for everyone!

The bidet populates bathrooms all over Asia, South America and Europe but has mostly been a source of bad jokes in the U.S. Now, increased demand spurred by foreigners planting roots is breaking down the barrier for the toilet-like fixture.
 (http://www.onenewspage.com/video/20131115/1498118/Bidets-Catch-on-in-Luxury-Homes.htm)

I wouldn't mind having one.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on November 20, 2013, 07:18:46 PM
  We had one for 25 years in Conn. and I freaking forgot to put on in this house and all I hear is how could you forget it. The Mrs. loved it  and I screwed up.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 09, 2014, 06:39:44 AM
Thinning herds I can buy...there has been a not too publicized rash of diseases go through many farm animals these past several years...but the rest of the blame is heaped on McDonalds and Burger King et al?

I smell something vile there...smells like...a load of fresh Obama!

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-beef-prices-20140406,0,2966247.story#axzz2yO7fWTgS (http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-beef-prices-20140406,0,2966247.story#axzz2yO7fWTgS)

Well, thanks to illegal Fedcoat confiscation though some of the effects of this shortage will be lessened...

http://itsaboutliberty.com/index.php?topic=11095.new#new (http://itsaboutliberty.com/index.php?topic=11095.new#new)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 09, 2014, 12:31:13 PM
http://www.omaha.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140312/MONEY/140319648 (http://www.omaha.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140312/MONEY/140319648)

"Bacon, pork chop prices could rise 25 percent as virus kills pigs."
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 09, 2014, 01:12:00 PM
I love bacon!!!  I better hoard some hog!!!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 11, 2014, 07:22:42 AM
Cattle herds decline for 7th straight year due to the drought, pig virus (mentioned by Pan above) decimating hog populations...

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-10/why-meat-prices-are-going-continue-soaring-foreseeable-future (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-10/why-meat-prices-are-going-continue-soaring-foreseeable-future)

...the drought hyperbole aside (nobody can know how long or short a drought may be, and if the El Nino is in fact rising, part of the effects can include good and bad for different regions, but generally more rain and flooding and such for south and west, so the good and bad news may rotate to new sectors by next season...but higher meat prices are to be expected for the foreseeable future...

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on April 11, 2014, 07:46:20 AM
  Part of the problem with hogs is that states like N.C. will not issue any more permits for what they call hog barns.I sold a woman a truck that has an interest in two hog barn in N.C. and is paid by Smithfield to raise pigs for them and as the limits on growing operations are imposed their fee for growing hogs goes up as there is more demand by a growing population increases.  The simple math is more demand less supply and prices go up and add to that sickness and you have a perfect storm for prices going up.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 11, 2014, 08:03:33 AM
I think that happens in Iowa and other places too, and I think the eco-nuts drive a lot of this nonesense, their blather about feedlots and waste and precious Gaia and all that rot, so yeah, I think as usual a lot of blame can be heaped on libiot heads!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: warpmine on April 12, 2014, 04:54:17 PM
Eggs in south central PA went up $.30 from last week and $.50 from the first of the year. Yeah, that economic policy is working great. How's it working for you?
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 13, 2014, 01:52:22 PM
Eggs in south central PA went up $.30 from last week and $.50 from the first of the year. Yeah, that economic policy is working great. How's it working for you?

As my husband is still unemployed and my oldest is facing the same in a few months, not so hot.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 14, 2014, 07:35:45 AM
Still in our prayers LV!   ::praying::

We all could definitely use deliverance from the evil in our midst, that's for sure!  But the news sure isn't trending the right way...
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on April 14, 2014, 11:09:18 AM
  Sorry to hear this LV. But keep the faith and it will all work out.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 14, 2014, 11:32:51 AM
thank you

His latest problem he's running into is being interviewed by (HR) people way younger than him who don't know the industry. So he answers questions with info on his experience and the interviewers don't know what he's talking about. The last guy to interview kept saying "awesome" every third sentence yet the reason he gave my husband's headhunter for not pursuing him further was that dh "lacked experience".  !!!  Dh said that's all he talked about even though the guy's questions were never directly about his work experience. I told dh maybe he should throw a few awesome in there every so often. haha   

Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 14, 2014, 12:13:19 PM
 ::facepalm::

Ufda...it's frustrating when you are stuck with the HR types...best thing you can do is try to spin your experience to their knowledge level, maybe un-techno the language, get the concept that I can do A, B and C across with minimum of description, that kind of thing...once you get to the actual department manager the detail and lingo will make sense to them...HR types are merely first level screeners and not very good at that especially in any kind of detailed professional or technical function...

On the plus side often times it is easier to bamboozle those types with buzzwords and other catch-phrases they are clued into...paradim, change agent, facilitator...stuff like that...

Unleash the babble on the HR clown and unleash the experience on the hiring manager...that's what I learned anyway.  Overall I've been able to size people up pretty quickly, certain questions they ask (scripted or not) indicate who you are dealing with, as is their interest in interviewing you, how attentive they are to your responses.

Oh, another thing is to not ramble...I used the term babble above but in reference to content not volume...often times letting silence take its course is difficult for people to deal with, they feel like they have to say something...anything...like the next utterance will be the deal clincher that moves them on or secures the spot.  Firm, confident concise answer and sitting comfortably in silence while you await the next exchange is a valuable skill to develop.

Hope things break for the better soon, LV!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on April 14, 2014, 02:15:29 PM
thank you

His latest problem he's running into is being interviewed by (HR) people way younger than him who don't know the industry. So he answers questions with info on his experience and the interviewers don't know what he's talking about. The last guy to interview kept saying "awesome" every third sentence yet the reason he gave my husband's headhunter for not pursuing him further was that dh "lacked experience".  !!!  Dh said that's all he talked about even though the guy's questions were never directly about his work experience. I told dh maybe he should throw a few awesome in there every so often. haha   



The values system that built this nation has collapsed. People no longer value what we once took for granted as "good". Things like having a work ethic and a personal sense of accomplishment.

What is valued these days is 1. conformity. Not whether you have tats or a nose ring but conformity of thought. 2. Team-player. Hand in hand with a general sense of group-think is the willingness to place your own personal ambitions second to the team (and especially the team-leader).

They don't want to know what you know; they don't want to know what you've accomplished. They want to know that you'll get along and go along.

Just remember - style over substance and you'll never go wrong! (unless you meet somebody old-school like me ;')
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 14, 2014, 04:09:14 PM
Thanks for the input. I think it is a struggle for him to interview with HR initially. It seems more places around here are using HR as the initial screener for the high level jobs my dh is looking for. It used not to be like that. He'd interview maybe one level below or even with someone above for the initial interview and then get a call for an all-day. And HR was usually the last interview of the all-day.

I think his interview skills are good. And he also sought the assistance of an interview coach last year to polish them. I think he lacks the ability to connect to these types of folks with the right buzzwords. These interviewers are looking for someone they like and feel connected to. I'm afraid he's coming across more grandpa than buddy.

I know what he needs to do to make that connection and I hope I can get him to take my suggestions. But you men  ::lalanotlistening::   ::laughonfloor::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on April 14, 2014, 04:52:52 PM
In 2000 I lost my job. I didn't worry about it because I knew (I thought) my skills were much in demand. After thousands of resumes and many dozens of interviews (more like cattle-calls) I revised my opinion. I even tried a coach who urged me to be empathetic and malleable (!). He wanted me to become the Chameleon that could be anything that any audience might want. Screw that!

I was working temp jobs when I accepted an interview for a job that I really wanted (as opposed to just another gig).  I decided to try a different approach. I had mostly interviewed well in the past - consistently finishing in the final five (and in several cases final two) but wasn't closing the deal. Instead of passively answering questions which are designed to place you on the defensive and winnow out the square pegs, I would take a more aggressive stance and drive the events. Throughout the interview process (there were three separate interviews) I stuck to a consistent theme: "I will save you money because I work safe, I work smart, and I work hard". I was prepared with strong examples of each facet, anticipating not only their next question but their objections as well.

The closest I came to butt-kissing was when I had the interview with what would become my boss. I told her that, "in my opinion my job is to make you look good. When I perform well people notice and it reflects well on you. If I crew up people immediately look at you as co-equal in blame. My job is to make sure people look at you approvingly".

Of course it does help that I believe that ;')

Remember the three rules of a good presentation: Tell them what you're going to tell them; tell them; and then tell them what you told them.

My statement about saving them money is an example of telling them what you're going to tell them. Fleshing out the claim with specific, relevant (to their organization) examples is telling them. And finishing with a strong, confident close is telling them what you told them.

One more anecdote: During a particularly dry spell when I couldn't scare up a decent interview for love nor money, I interviewed for several jobs I didn't care about. I did so to hone my skills and try out techniques that I didn't dare try on a "must win" interview, and to keep my spirits up. That last part is crucial. It is demoralizing as all get-out to want to work and not be able to do so. It's also one of the most stressful things in a man's life. Your husband is a lucky guy to have someone on his side. It's killer to go it alone.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 14, 2014, 07:52:25 PM
Back on topic:

We love Easter candy in our house a lot. This one always makes us laugh though it's a few years old.:

Cadbury Conspiracy (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FiA57ir5QM#)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 14, 2014, 09:49:23 PM
Yep, yep, yep.  I stash toilet paper and the older stuff is definitely taller than the newer stuff.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 15, 2014, 03:31:48 PM
So, let's see, the price of beef has skyrocketed (http://www.kens5.com/news/255294801.html) due to droughts in 2009 and 2011 when ranchers dumped their cattle, and still "a dwindling number of cattle" -- Feds driving ranchers off land and out of business; that'd be a little factoid not covered in this piece -- and "growing export demand from China and Japan"; pork prices are up because of a virus; California (http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2014/03/06/states-join-suit-to-block-california-egg-law/) seems intent on raising the costs and prices of chickens and eggs and now the prices of produce -- fruits and vegetables -- are set to rise (http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2014/04/15/attention-shoppers-fruit-and-vegetable-prices-rising/) because of a "drought in California" -- no mention of withholding water from a reservoir specifically built to use as an irrigation source on behalf of a STINKIN' BAIT FISH -- and this here is rich ...

Quote
Still, the run-up in prices is likely to be somewhat temporary, Mr. Richards said. When prices increase, farmers outside of California, including foreign suppliers, will be incentivized to ship more crops to the U.S. That will in turn put downward pressure on costs.

But with water-supply problems expected to persist for years, California farmers will have some difficult choices to make, he said. They’ll need to determine which crops should receive the limited amount of available water, and which should be allowed to fall away.

“We could be looking at future,” he said, “where California is no longer bread basket for the country.”

... well, whoopdeedo, we can just get our tomatoes from Mexico and lettuce from wherethehellever because this guy expects some "choices should be allowed to fall away" from our own national breadbasket and because these are jobs Americans won't do anyway -- no mention of what the illegals will do; guess they don't want the farm jobs anymore either andandandand

ARGH!!!    ::gaah:: ::outrage:: ::pullhair::

The expensive meat stuff ought to make the PETA a-holes happy, but folks not eating meat still need to eat *something*.  Or not. The whole thing ought to make the human-hating humans ecstatic.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 16, 2014, 11:48:23 AM
 ::facepalm::

Pepsi mini cans parallel the storyline by demonstrating that sometimes a 7.5-ounce of Pepsi is just the right amount of satisfaction ... (http://www.bevnet.com/news/2014/pepsi-pays-homage-to-oscars-with-mini-can-ad)

Introducing Pepsi Mini Cans: "Mini Hollywood" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCXr7ECpGQg#ws)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 16, 2014, 12:06:19 PM
AKA "Get used to paying more for less, serf!".

 ::moneyshaker::

 ::upsidedownflag::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on April 16, 2014, 01:36:52 PM
::facepalm::

Pepsi mini cans parallel the storyline by demonstrating that sometimes a 7.5-ounce of Pepsi is just the right amount of satisfaction ... (http://www.bevnet.com/news/2014/pepsi-pays-homage-to-oscars-with-mini-can-ad)

Okay, I saw that commercial and didn't know why it was quoting movies. I didn't watch the Oscars. As soon as I saw that ad I knew it was to hide a price increase. I just read an article somewhere that soda consumption last year went down -- 13% if I remember correctly. Both Coke and Pepsi experienced lower sales in 2013.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on April 16, 2014, 04:25:03 PM
I don't drink much soda at all, so I don't have a dog in this fight, so to speak, but with having the government at all levels at war with a product -- particularly in the schools, but Bloomberg gets a big thumbs-down -- yes, consumption is going to fall.  I'd rather see an ad that highlighted that, including the price increase, than one that pretends that less content is based on "consumer demand" for a mini-can.

Don't pee on me, gawdammy, and then tell me it's raining.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on April 27, 2014, 09:13:17 PM
Hog virus still raging, decimating piglets all over...

http://news.yahoo.com/killer-virus-spreads-unchecked-u-hog-belt-pushing-180045876--finance.html;_ylt=AwrTWfwiSF1TLkcA_ArQtDMD (http://news.yahoo.com/killer-virus-spreads-unchecked-u-hog-belt-pushing-180045876--finance.html;_ylt=AwrTWfwiSF1TLkcA_ArQtDMD)


ETA - This says it all:  (http://finviz.com/fut_chart.ashx?t=LH&cot=054642&p=d1)

http://finviz.com/futures_charts.ashx?t=LH (http://finviz.com/futures_charts.ashx?t=LH)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on May 16, 2014, 07:30:00 AM
Meat Index - prices show no inclinination to fall anytime soon...

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-15/meat-prices-surge-most-11-years (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-15/meat-prices-surge-most-11-years)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on May 22, 2014, 08:17:48 AM
  Ranchers aren't going to build herds up to work harder to make the same money. It's smarter to keep prices where they are even with the cost of production falling.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on May 29, 2014, 07:53:31 AM
Well, the continued pig virus is going to keep pork prices high...concerns the virus may be mutating...

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-28/bacon-prices-soar-even-more-pig-diarrhea-virus-back-round-two (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-28/bacon-prices-soar-even-more-pig-diarrhea-virus-back-round-two)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on July 07, 2014, 07:59:42 AM
I know its been bad and getting worse...but jeesh!  This is just since the start fo the year!

(http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user3303/imageroot/2014/07/20140706_break_0.jpg)

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-07-06/foodflation-qe3-breakfast-over-24 (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-07-06/foodflation-qe3-breakfast-over-24)

Go back to the start of this Neo-Keynesian nightmare and see those numbers go through the roof!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Weisshaupt on July 07, 2014, 04:31:31 PM
Won't be "hidden" much longer

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-07-07/do-you-really-think-official-inflation-numbers-are-even-close-accurate (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-07-07/do-you-really-think-official-inflation-numbers-are-even-close-accurate)

Quote
Regarding #4, Burger King was caught putting wood pulp in its burgers.

There may be more fiber in your food than you realized. Burger King, McDonald’s and other fast food companies list in the ingredients of several of their foods, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) or “powdered cellulose” as components of their menu items. Or, in plain English, wood pulp.

The emulsion-stabilizing, cling-improving, anti-caking substance operates under multiple aliases, ranging from powdered cellulose to cellulose powder to methylcellulose to cellulose gum. The entrance of this non-absorbable fiber into fast food ingredients has been stealthy, yet widespread: The compound can now be found in buns, cheeses, sauces, cakes, shakes, rolls, fries, onion rings, smoothies, meats—basically everything.

The cost effectiveness of this filler has pushed many chains to use progressively less chicken in their “chicken” and cream in their “ice cream.” McDonald’s ranks highest on the list with cellulose integrated into 14 of their menu items including their renowned fish fillets, chicken strips and biscuits, with Burger King ranking second on the list with 13 menu items  containing cellulose. Moreover, many cellulose-laden ingredients (such as honey mustard, bbq sauce, and cheese blends) can be found in multiple items throughout the menu making the filler difficult to avoid.

And the rotisserie chicken t our supermarket looks like a small  quail..



 
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on July 07, 2014, 04:43:40 PM
Drinkdrinkdrinkdrink, drinkdrinkdrinkdrink .........

/Sorry.  It's a mood.  And I haven't had a drink yet.

//Wonder how much cellulose finds its way into red wine.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on July 07, 2014, 10:08:50 PM
another reason to eat out less often
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: LadyVirginia on July 29, 2014, 10:02:28 PM
not food but same thing:
https://www.scottbrand.com/products/toilet-paper/tubefree (https://www.scottbrand.com/products/toilet-paper/tubefree)

Scott Paper to get rid of tube in TP. At their website they want us to pledge to "toss the tube".
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on July 29, 2014, 10:14:05 PM
Yep, saw that.  That many pennies less to make the product.  Think the price will come down correspondingly?  Nah.

We've been recycling the tubes.  I stuff the paper (from the individually-wrapped rolls) into the tube and save for lighting fires in the winter or put them in the "other paper" recycling bin.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on July 30, 2014, 05:27:59 PM
  Just spotted a sale on Angus choice New York strip steak for 5.99 a pound but I have to buy the whole piece avg. 12/14 lbs. Cut to order for free.  I'm in for a couple of them. Thank god for vacuum packers.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Pandora on July 30, 2014, 05:37:56 PM
Good find!  Stock uuuuup.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on July 30, 2014, 08:41:42 PM
  Just spotted a sale on Angus choice New York strip steak for 5.99 a pound but I have to buy the whole piece avg. 12/14 lbs. Cut to order for free.  I'm in for a couple of them. Thank god for vacuum packers.

This is especially good in view of a story I just saw today:

Cargill to close beef plant, cites cattle shortage

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CARGILL_BEEF_PLANT?SITE=MYPSP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-07-30-16-14-13 (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CARGILL_BEEF_PLANT?SITE=MYPSP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-07-30-16-14-13)
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Alphabet Soup on July 30, 2014, 08:44:33 PM
Yep, saw that.  That many pennies less to make the product.  Think the price will come down correspondingly?  Nah.

We've been recycling the tubes.  I stuff the paper (from the individually-wrapped rolls) into the tube and save for lighting fires in the winter or put them in the "other paper" recycling bin.

I visited one of our branch offices today. In the breakroom I saw a large bag of trash (paper products). There was a sign on it urging anyone to take it home and mix it with their "recyclables".

Hell, I do exactly the opposite (take my trash to work to get rid of it)!
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: John Florida on July 30, 2014, 08:49:05 PM
  Just spotted a sale on Angus choice New York strip steak for 5.99 a pound but I have to buy the whole piece avg. 12/14 lbs. Cut to order for free.  I'm in for a couple of them. Thank god for vacuum packers.

This is especially good in view of a story I just saw today:

Cargill to close beef plant, cites cattle shortage

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CARGILL_BEEF_PLANT?SITE=MYPSP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-07-30-16-14-13 (http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CARGILL_BEEF_PLANT?SITE=MYPSP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2014-07-30-16-14-13)

 I must have hit on a loss leader which is just fine with me.Being just the two of us in the house I can put up around 24 meals if I get two 12 pounders but I'm going for more.
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on August 07, 2014, 08:49:27 AM
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-06/inflation-watch-incredible-shrinking-coke-can (http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-06/inflation-watch-incredible-shrinking-coke-can)

 ::facepalm::

I switched to cheaper full-sized cans of Shasta cola, I need caffeine somehow, and don't like coffee or tea much...and Coke and their halal crap and tiny house/tiny can can KMA!

 ::mooning::
Title: Re: Food inflation kept hidden in smaller packaging
Post by: Libertas on September 08, 2014, 08:39:20 PM
Just read a report on Drudge about milk being up 27% this year!

Sorry I cannot link (haven't figured out how to do that with this little tablet).

But the Feds say all is well, inflation is a myth...